Here’s what you need to know to build successful paid newsletters, popup newsletters, morning digests, and community newsletters

Thinking about starting your own email newsletter? A panel at ISOJ 2018 contains a wealth of advice for launching all types of editorial newsletters, from paywalled offerings to limited-run recaps tied to popular television shows to indispensable morning digests to community-creating newsletters. Continue reading “Here’s what you need to know to build successful paid newsletters, popup newsletters, morning digests, and community newsletters”

@opencitations @EuropePMC_news and #EXCITEProject are happy to announce that applications to the Workshop on Open Citations (3-5 Sept, Bologna, Italy) are now open! See https://workshop-oc.github.io/  for details. @i4oc_org #OpenCitationsMonth #OpenCitations #EuropePMC #hackathonpic.twitter.com/EHumdTfTzl

and are happy to announce that applications to the Workshop on Open Citations (3-5 Sept, Bologna, Italy) are now open! See https://workshop-oc.github.io/  for details.

Do preprints have a place in today’s reference lists?

Do preprints have a place in todays’ reference lists TransparencyThe use of preprints (a research paper made publicly available before publication in a peer reviewed journal) is on the rise in the biomedical field. In an article in The Scholarly Kitchen, David Crotty asks whether preprints should be cited in the same way as articles published in a peer reviewed journal. While discussing the pros and cons of using preprints, the author recognises the need for clear citation guidelines. He concludes that publishers will need to play an active role in establishing a broadly accepted standard to “preserve quality, transparency and trustworthiness of scholarly literature”. Continue reading “Do preprints have a place in today’s reference lists?”

Passive subscriber churn — and how to mitigate it (VB Live)


VB LIVE: Subscription businesses can lose the happiest of subscribers because of involuntary churn. But machine learning can automatically reduce this passive churn and boost monthly recurring revenue by an average of 9 percent. Learn more about how to improve transaction success rates and billing continuity when you join this VB Live event! Access…Read More

How Targeted “Pop-Up Newsletters” Grab Hyperengaged Audiences

All that time and effort for an open rate of 20 percent hardly seems worth it, does it? Newsletter marketing might be experiencing a renaissance, but so much of it sticks to a tried-and-true formula: regular drops, same template, point to content available on your hub. Not that there’s anything wrong with that; it’s tried-and-true for a reason. But is it really maximizing the impact of your fantastic brand storytelling? Continue reading “How Targeted “Pop-Up Newsletters” Grab Hyperengaged Audiences”

Bronze beats gold in open access: implications for data re-use

Bronze open access.jpg

Support for the open access (OA) movement is increasing, yet the majority of OA articles do not have a license that permits free re-use of contents, and so do not fully comply with the 2002 Budapest OA Initiative (BOAI) definition of OA. In a recent study by Piwowar et al, representative samples were taken from the online databases Crossref, Web of Science and Unpaywall (100,000 articles from each) to determine the prevalence and type of OA publications. Importantly, this involved categorisation of articles as follows:

  • gold OA – published in an OA journal indexed by the Directory of OA Journals (DOAJ)
  • green OA – paid-for access via the publisher’s webpage but free access in an OA repository
  • hybrid OA – OA in a journal that also publishes non-OA articles
  • ‘bronze’ OA – free to read on the publisher’s webpage but without a license permitting free re-use of content
  • closed access – all other articles.

The most common form of OA was ‘bronze’. This may have implications for research; the lack of a license permitting the free re-use of an article’s contents can substantially restrict the impact of the data therein, for example by preventing other groups from conducting further analyses. In a recent Nature Index article, Piwowar notes that in the current age of machine learning and ‘big data’, it is especially important that data are freely available for computational analysis. Overall, the study found that 47% of articles were OA in 2015 (the most recent year of analysis), and the authors predict that all articles could be OA by 2040. Despite this encouraging forecast, the future of OA may be less bright if bronze OA continues to prevail.

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Summary by Emma Prest PhD from Aspire Scientific


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The post Bronze beats gold in open access: implications for data re-use appeared first on The Publication Plan for everyone interested in medical writing, the development of medical publications, and publication planning.

Tweetstorms are better with friends: How three papers are tweeting together over 4-plus days

Tweetstorms are usually the work of one person, but what if you could bring other voices in too? That’s what The Washington Post, Baltimore Sun, and Chicago Tribune did this week: They worked together to tweet about the riots that followed Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination in 1968.

The threaded tweets linked back to the papers’ own coverage of the 50th anniversary of the assassination and how it affected their respective cities. Here’s the Post’s coverage, here’s the Sun’s, and here’s the Tribune’s.

The thread was the original idea of Tauhid Chappell, who until recently was an embedded audience editor on The Washington Post’s local desk (he’ll soon start a position as the engagement editor at the Philly Inquirer). The project was run by the Post’s Julie Vitkovskaya, digital operations/projects director, and Ric Sanchez, social media editor; the Tribune’s digital news editor Elizabeth Wolfe, and the Sun’s audience editor Steve Earley. In a shared Google doc, they planned out tweets, including the timestamps for roughly when each would go out. The first tweet was sent at 7:01 p.m. ET on April 4, almost exactly 50 years since King was pronounced dead and the riots began. The papers will continue to tweet for as long as the riots lasted in their cities: The Post will stop adding to the thread on April 7, the Tribune will add to it through April 8, and the Sun will add to the thread through April 14, when the Baltimore riots ended.

Vitkovskaya has been thinking about how a group tweet thread would work within the Post — for example, the Post’s main account could start tweeting about a story like the violence in Gaza, and then the Post’s Jerusalem bureau chief, Loveday Morris, could continue tweeting and reporting from Gaza itself over a period of several days. “We see this as a tool we’d like to use again,” she said.

Tech Talks ft Sharon Cooper

Sharon is the CDO at the British Medical Journal, the print publishing arm of the British Medical Association. Previously she held the title of CTO, but she doesn’t have a software/engineering background. We chat about her challenge to digitise the organisation, and how DevOps is making the BMJ safer!

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