ADS THAT DON’T OVERSTEP

Recent research reveals that digital targeting improves ad performance. But there’s a fine line between creepy and delightful, says HBS professor Leslie K. John. As targeted advertising becomes more sophisticated—and people become more aware of how their privacy can be compromised—offering them meaningful control over their personal information is critical. This Harvard Business Review article outlines five steps that digital marketers can take to create personalized ads that generate customer value instead of a consumer backlash.

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Lessons Learned from the Quartz Email Team

An interview with Eva ScazzeroJessanne Collins, and Adam Pasick of Quartz.

Including an awesome range of elements (animated GIFs, infographics, videos, and embedded surveys and quizzes), Quartz delivers some of the most engaging and interactive newsletters we’ve ever seen. Design-wise, they’re clean and consistent. Content-wise, they’re smart, relevant, and well-written. And the topics of their Obsession emails are random and nerdy enough to give you a killer edge at trivia night.

Gamifying their newsletter has yielded tremendous results: growing to 700,000 subscribers, they doubled the size of their subscriber base in 2017. ….

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The Rundown: Google distances itself from ‘platforms’

In this week’s Rundown: Google distances itself from “platforms,” Snapchat and Twitter woo publishers and Amazon lags in India.

What’s in a name?
As Facebook gets blamed for everything from polarizing America to helping Donald Trump’s election, it’s no accident that Google is distancing itself from the social network. One way is how it’s referred to. Recently, Google execs have insisted to anyone who will listen that Google is not to be called a platform. They’d rather it be a “technology company” or “just Google.” There’s a fair point there that key differences exist among the big tech platforms; Facebook is a walled garden and built around social interactions, while Google is about indexing the world’s information. Both make their money from advertising. But the subtext is that Facebook is taking a beating from just about everyone right now, and Google wants to be seen as one of the good guys. Just don’t call it a media company. — Lucia Moses

This article is behind the Digiday+ paywall.

The post The Rundown: Google distances itself from ‘platforms’ appeared first on Digiday.

Twitter will crack down on automation and simultaneous actions across multiple accounts

(Reuters) — Twitter said on Wednesday it would no longer allow people to post identical messages from multiple accounts, cracking down on a tactic that Russian agents and others have allegedly used to make tweets or topics go viral.

The San Francisco-based social network also said it would not allow people to use software to simultaneously perform other actions such as liking or retweeting from multiple accounts. Continue reading “Twitter will crack down on automation and simultaneous actions across multiple accounts”

Atypon’s Artificial Intelligence R&D Fuels Four More BioASQ Awards in Semantic Technologies

February 21, 2018 – Santa Clara, CA – For the fifth year in a row, Atypon has placed in the widely respected International BioASQ Awards competition. Atypon’s ongoing research and development (R&D) into artificial intelligence technologies led to four awards for four different semantic technology categories in the 2017 BioASQ Challenge. Continue reading “Atypon’s Artificial Intelligence R&D Fuels Four More BioASQ Awards in Semantic Technologies”

Publishers warm to Google, but still worry about getting crowded out in search results

Google has done several things to make publishers smile lately: From its work on fast-loading mobile pages to ending first-click-free to promoting subscription sales, Google has positioned itself favorably with publishers, especially as Facebook’s relationship with publishers has become increasingly strained. Continue reading “Publishers warm to Google, but still worry about getting crowded out in search results”

Citations as First-Class Data Entities: Introduction

Citations are now centre stage

As a result of the Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC), launched on April 6 last year, almost all the major scholarly publishers now open the reference lists they submit to Crossref, resulting in more than half a billion references being openly available via the Crossref API.

It is therefore time to think carefully about how citations are treated, and how they might be better handled as part of the Linked Open Data Web. Continue reading “Citations as First-Class Data Entities: Introduction”

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