He Predicted The 2016 Fake News Crisis. Now He’s Worried About An Information Apocalypse.

In mid-2016Aviv Ovadya realized there was something fundamentally wrong with the internet — so wrong that he abandoned his work and sounded an alarm. A few weeks before the 2016 election, he presented his concerns to technologists in San Francisco’s Bay Area and warned of an impending crisis of misinformation in a presentation he titled “Infocalypse.”

“What happens when anyone can make it appear as if anything has happened, regardless of whether or not it did?” technologist Aviv Ovadya warns.

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Crypto Canon

Here’s a list — building on and including Chris’ last roundup — of crypto readings and resources. It’s organized from building blocks and basics; foundations (& history); and key concepts and beginners’ guides — followed by specific topics such as governance; privacy and security; scaling; consensus; cryptoeconomics and investing; fundraising and token distribution; decentralized exchanges; stablecoins; and cryptoeconomic primitives (crytocollectibles, curation markets, games). We also included a section with developer tutorials, practical guides, and maker stories — as well as other resources, such as newsletters and courses, at the end.

We’ll soon be updating this regularly at crypto.a16z.com, for now we’ll keep it updated here. You can also find most of a16z’s writings, posts, and videos on the topic at a16z.com/crypto.

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Open science: University of Toronto researchers to publish lab notes in real time

About 20 scientists affiliated with a University of Toronto research organization have agreed to publish their lab notes in real time, a groundbreaking move aimed at hastening the discovery of new medical treatments.

The researchers, who work on some of the most untreatable diseases, such as ALS and rare children’s brain tumors, are part of the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), which has laboratories  at U of T and McGill University in Canada, and laboratories in Europe, the U.S. and South America.

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What we read this week (9 Feb 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. Check back every Friday for a new post.

Voice UI

Voice UI is definitely coming but the big question is what will researchers use it for? We have plenty of anecdotal evidence that users are listening to academic articles via a range of apps and browser functionality . BMJ is experimenting with voice driven interactions but even simple things like indexing the BMJ in TuneIn to allow users to ask Alexa to play them has proved tricky. “Alexa play Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery podcast” usually works but “Alexa play Heart podcast” isn’t going to bring up the Heart Journal podcast – especially near Valentine’s Day! Continue reading “What we read this week (9 Feb 2018)”

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