What we read this week (27 April 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. It’s an eclectic mix this week:

Publishing:

We’re really interested to see how the FT’s experiment with :CRUX to use Knowledge Acquisition as an approach to content recommendation will work out. We could see this approach working well for some of our audience segments.

Continue reading “What we read this week (27 April 2018)”

Lessons Learned from the Quartz Email Team

An interview with Eva ScazzeroJessanne Collins, and Adam Pasick of Quartz.

Including an awesome range of elements (animated GIFs, infographics, videos, and embedded surveys and quizzes), Quartz delivers some of the most engaging and interactive newsletters we’ve ever seen. Design-wise, they’re clean and consistent. Content-wise, they’re smart, relevant, and well-written. And the topics of their Obsession emails are random and nerdy enough to give you a killer edge at trivia night.

Gamifying their newsletter has yielded tremendous results: growing to 700,000 subscribers, they doubled the size of their subscriber base in 2017. ….

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Has the tide turned? A new culture for Responsible Metrics is on the horizon

Katrine Sundsbø reflects on the UK Forum for Responsible Metrics event, held on the 7th February 2018.

The topic ‘responsible metrics’ has gone from hot to boiling after RCUK signed DORA(San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment) Wednesday 7th February. This means that they, as a funding organisation, are committing to good practice in regards to the use of metrics in research assessment. The timing of the event by UK Forum for Responsible Metrics on Thursday 8th February could therefore not have been better.

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TechBlog: eLife replaces commenting system with Hypothesis annotations

The next time you feel moved to comment on an article in the open-access online journal eLife, be prepared for a different user experience. On 31 January, eLife announced it had adopted the open-source annotation service, Hypothesis, replacing its traditional commenting system. That’s the result of a year-long effort between the two services to make Hypothesis more amenable to the scholarly publishing community.

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Copyright and systematic reviews: do researchers have to break the rules to produce good quality research?

Jane Falconer is a medical librarian with over 20 years experience in medical charities, the NHS and Higher Education. She is currently the User Support Services Librarian at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, responsible for all user-facing library services, including user training and support, membership, access and enquiry support, reading lists, interlibrary loans and liaison services. She also provides literature searching support for systematic reviews, she has created and run the searches on a number of projects including the Lancet Commission on Planetary Health and the WHO Guidelines on Heptatitis B and C Testing. ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7329-0577. Jane got in touch via Twitter as she was frustrated by copyright laws that prevented her sharing medical articles with researchers around the world. Here’s what she told us…..

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Introducing HuffPost Opinion And HuffPost Personal

“One of the biggest challenges we all face, in an era where everyone has a platform, is figuring out whom to listen to. Open platforms that once seemed radically democratizing now threaten, with the tsunami of false information we all face daily, to undermine democracy. When everyone has a megaphone, no one can be heard. Our hope is that by listening carefully through all the noise, we can find the voices that need to be heard and elevate them for all of you.”

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In defence of the chatbot

Remember chatbots? That thing everyone talked about before blockchain swooped in and stole the show? Well, according to Wired, Chatbots are dead. Brands already cooled on chatbots in 2017 and the shutdown of M, a Facebook Messenger bot which automatically completes tasks for users, might be the final nail in the coffin. But should we really be dismissing chatbots that quickly?

We caught up with John Keefe, bot developer at Quartz; Eduardo Suárezand Miguel Eduardo Gil Biraud from Politibot, a chatbot platform that was created in 2016 for the Spanish elections; and Philipp Naderer from Austrian public broadcaster ORF who created the Wahl-bot for the Austrian presidential elections — all to get a better idea of where chatbots stand in early 2018, whether newsrooms should invest in them, and how to make a chatbot live up to our expectations.

Read full story on Medium

 

Think small: the new metrics of engagement for news

“And small numbers of loyal users can mean big revenues:

  • The 22,000 “partners” who pay 60 euros a year for eldiario.es in Spain represent nearly 40% of their revenues but less than 1% of their total unique users, according to the CEO (in Spanish).
  • The 2.5 million digital-only subscribers to the New York Times represent less than 3% of their total users but now generate more revenue than print advertising, a historic milestone.”

 

Read full blog post by James Breiner

How to listen to BMJ articles using Firefox

Hat tip to M.G. Siegler for alerting us to the narrate feature in Firefox. To listen to a BMJ article in Firefox:

  1. Go to a BMJ article for example: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/12/e017917
  2. Go to the Reader View by clicking on the Reader View reader mode icon 57 icon in the address bar
  3. Then click on the “Narrate” button on the left hand side
  4. Listen and visually follow along to the text. You can change the voice to have a British or American accent

 

Google announces solution to longstanding AMP cache URL display problem

Later this year, the Google AMP cache will finally display publisher URLs instead of Google URLs in the search results.

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Things we read this week (5 January 2018)

  • Research Workflows
    Investing in researcher workflow tools is an obvious next step for publishers seeking to increase revenues. It’s not hard to imagine, as Roger C. Schonfeld does, a future world in which Institutions drift into buying bundles of products and services alongside their institutional subscriptions. I think it’s more useful to follow Hax’s Delta model (see below) and think of these as total customer solutions strategies rather than lock-in strategies. A bundle which includes journal subscriptions, a research evaluation tool, an institutional repository and a reference management tool thrown in for free is likely to be cheaper and more efficient than purchasing and running all of those products from different vendors. Although this is likely to lead to lock-in/competitor lock-out.
    The “Delta Model” of Arnoldo Hax ...Not sure what Researcher Workflows are? Terry Clague also has a useful post trying to define the term “researcher workflow”.  LabWorm’s roundup of the Top 17 trending research tools/sites of 2017 that were most appreciated and used by the LabWorm community is an interesting insight into what researchers are actually using. (H/T: @pluto_network). Not on LabWorm’s list is ContentMine  which claims to provide tools for getting papers from many online sources, normalising them, then processing them to lookup and/or search for key terms, phrases, patterns, statements, and more – something to try next week.

Continue reading “Things we read this week (5 January 2018)”

Things we read this week (5 January 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. Check back every Friday for a new post.

  • Research Workflows
    Investing in researcher workflow tools is an obvious next step for publishers seeking to increase revenues. It’s not hard to imagine, as Roger C. Schonfeld does, a future world in which Institutions drift into buying bundles of products and services alongside their institutional subscriptions. I think it’s more useful to follow Hax’s Delta model (see below) and think of these as total customer solutions strategies rather than lock-in strategies. A bundle which includes journal subscriptions, a research evaluation tool, an institutional repository and a reference management tool thrown in for free is likely to be cheaper and more efficient than purchasing and running all of those products from different vendors. Although this is likely to lead to lock-in/competitor lock-out.
    Not sure what Researcher Workflows are? Terry Clague also has a useful post trying to define the term “researcher workflow”.  LabWorm’s roundup of the Top 17 trending research tools/sites of 2017 that were most appreciated and used by the LabWorm community is an interesting insight into what researchers are actually using. (H/T: @pluto_network). Not on LabWorm’s list is ContentMine  which claims to provide tools for getting papers from many online sources, normalising them, then processing them to lookup and/or search for key terms, phrases, patterns, statements, and more – something to try next week.

 

  • Voice technology
    Voice technologies might be hot, see the Stop typing, start talking section of Schibsted’s Future Report, but they are also hard. Our experience with getting Alexa to play BMJ’s podcasts proved exasperating, “Alexa play Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery podcast from TuneIn” usually works, “Alexa play BMJ Podcast” tends to give you WBMJ which is a bilingual Bible teaching network.  Saying med-sin, med-i-sin or med-sun will get you different results. How Publishers Can Prepare for Voice Technology (H/T: @robeirne) suggests building generic topic rather than brand specific skills please get in touch (future@bmj.com) if you’re interested in working with us on this.

 

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