‘A massive scramble’: Candid thoughts of marketers on GDPR fallout

Data privacy and getting compliant in time for the General Data Protection Regulation was a hotly debated topic for marketers attending the Digiday Programmatic Marketing Summit Europe in Estoril, Portugal, this week.

With less than a month to go until the deadline for GDPR enforcement, uncertainty around who in the supply chain will be held responsible should regulators decide to prosecute remains top of mind. We’ve collected some of the main concerns that attendees talked about throughout the week — under condition of anonymity — to give a flavor of what execs across the digital ad industry are truly thinking. Continue reading “‘A massive scramble’: Candid thoughts of marketers on GDPR fallout”

‘We want publishers to think the unthinkable’: How Axel Springer is reducing its reliance on Google ad tech

Axel Springer is on a mission to cut down on its dependence on Google ad tech — and it’s making progress.

In January, the German digital media giant, owner of Business Insider, Bild and other titles, completed the shift from its former waterfall-based ad tech stack used with Google in favor of using AppNexus as its ad server, into which it can plug in a variety of demand partners (including Google). It’s a strategy it began last spring. The result: Programmatic revenues rose 10 percent compared to the same period last year, while eCPMs jumped 28 percent. The publisher won’t disclose what percentage of its digital ad revenue comes from programmatically bought ads. Continue reading “‘We want publishers to think the unthinkable’: How Axel Springer is reducing its reliance on Google ad tech”

French media is in talks about collaborating on a unified login system

Concerns about the looming ePrivacy Regulation, not to mention fear of the duopoly, are prompting European publishers to collaborate on joint consumer login systems. So far, Germany and Portugal have led the charge. Now, it looks like France could join the fray.

Leading national newspapers Le Monde, Le Figaro and Le Parisien are among the publishers discussing the potential for implementing a common single login across their sites, through which users can be automatically authenticated each time they visit one of the publishers’ sites. Continue reading “French media is in talks about collaborating on a unified login system”

How GDPR could weaken, not strengthen, the duopoly

Consensus on whether Google and Facebook stand to win or lose as a result of Europe’s new data-privacy laws seems to be changing.

Popular opinion has been that the direct relationship Facebook and Google have with consumers will make it easy for them to obtain consent, and as such they will ultimately be at an advantage. But as the deadline for the General Data Protection Regulation‘s enforcement edges closer and the ePrivacy Regulation continues to loom, a different line of thinking is emerging: that Google and Facebook are also in for a thrashing, in the short term at least. Continue reading “How GDPR could weaken, not strengthen, the duopoly”

How the Guardian’s Instagram strategy is winning new readers

Like many publishers, the Guardian is using Instagram to cultivate a loyal, young audience that doesn’t visit its main digital products.

The publisher has steadily grown its following and has nearly 860,000 Instagram followers to date, up 57 percent from a year ago. More interesting yet, 60 percent of those who follow links to the Guardian’s site are new to the Guardian, according to the publisher. The plan is to encourage those followers to become regular readers of the Guardian’s site and apps and, in time, possibly even paying members. Continue reading “How the Guardian’s Instagram strategy is winning new readers”

How Swedish tabloid Aftonbladet reached 250,000 digital subscribers

Swedish national tabloid Aftonbladet has become one of Europe’s biggest digital-subscriptions success stories.

The newspaper, owned by Scandinavian media giant Schibsted, has amassed 250,000 digital subscribers (at $7-$12 a month) since launching its digital subscriptions program in 2003, a lofty figure given Sweden’s population of 10 million. Aftonbladet made 255 million Swedish krona ($32 million) in profit in 2017, driven by both advertising and subscriptions, according to its latest financials released last week. Continue reading “How Swedish tabloid Aftonbladet reached 250,000 digital subscribers”

With ePrivacy looming, German publishers scramble to get users logged in

The looming ePrivacy Regulation is creating a new battleground in Europe: the race to own consumer login systems, for better or worse.

When and how publishers arrive there depends on their business models and markets. But in Germany, the login strategy is a tactic many are adopting to ensure their business’ sustainability, should they have to abide by the proposed ePrivacy law and gain consumer consent for all cookie use. Continue reading “With ePrivacy looming, German publishers scramble to get users logged in”

Spiegel Online CEO Jesper Doub on the pivot to consumer revenue, the duopoly and privacy regulations

Jesper Doub, CEO of publisher Spiegel Online, believes the time is right to create a subscriptions model. In a recent conversation, Doub discussed Spiegel’s reader-revenue strategy, the ePrivacy Regulation and the duopoly’s power. Our conversation has been edited and condensed. Continue reading “Spiegel Online CEO Jesper Doub on the pivot to consumer revenue, the duopoly and privacy regulations”

In 2018, GDPR will cause chaos for publishers, marketers

May 25 will be the day of reckoning for many businesses in the media and marketing industries. It’s the date Europe’s highly anticipated General Data Protection Regulation kicks in, from which point no business operating in Europe can use data without explicit permission from users to do so. The maximum penalty for noncompliance: fines to the tune of €20 million ($24 million) or 4 percent of annual sales.

The GDPR is a slow-moving wrecking ball, after a two-year incubation period that served mostly to heighten confusion over what the regulation means and how to get out of its way. In 2018, the hand-wringing and chatter will give way to action, with a period of intense pain, while companies come to grips with a post-GDPR world. For all the talk of revolution, the GDPR will end up a blip for most rather than a world made new. But that will be after the new regulation causes its share of confusion.

The post In 2018, GDPR will cause chaos for publishers, marketers appeared first on Digiday.

‘Our relationship with Facebook is difficult’: The Guardian’s David Pemsel says the platform doesn’t value quality

This article appears in the latest issue of Digiday magazine, a quarterly publication that is part of Digiday+. Members of Digiday+ get access to exclusive content, original research and member events throughout the year. Learn more here

David Pemsel, CEO of Guardian News and Media, is concerned about Facebook but bullish on the ability of philanthropic contributions to fund publishing. Below is our conversation, which has been lightly edited and condensed. Continue reading “‘Our relationship with Facebook is difficult’: The Guardian’s David Pemsel says the platform doesn’t value quality”

British GQ and Universal Music test shareable podcast formats

Universal Music and Condé Nast men’s magazine British GQ are testing podcast formats that can be broken down into chunks for sharing and include images and graphics to accompany each chapter, rather than full 30-minute or hourlong shows. The idea is for people to be able to listen to bite-size chapters of audio if they don’t have time to listen to a full podcast, and share them with friends. Continue reading “British GQ and Universal Music test shareable podcast formats”

How the BBC is using voice assistants like Amazon Echo and Google Home

Next year, the BBC will pair editorial staffers with its software engineers to figure out what content experience people want from voice-enabled devices like the Amazon Echo and Google Home in order to inform new interactive editorial formats that are technically feasible.

“We will do some experiments together,” said Mukul Devichand, editorial lead for BBC Voice. “We are keen to understand what it means to natively publish in this platform — no one has cracked it yet.” Continue reading “How the BBC is using voice assistants like Amazon Echo and Google Home”

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