Here’s what you need to know to build successful paid newsletters, popup newsletters, morning digests, and community newsletters

Thinking about starting your own email newsletter? A panel at ISOJ 2018 contains a wealth of advice for launching all types of editorial newsletters, from paywalled offerings to limited-run recaps tied to popular television shows to indispensable morning digests to community-creating newsletters. Continue reading “Here’s what you need to know to build successful paid newsletters, popup newsletters, morning digests, and community newsletters”

How Targeted “Pop-Up Newsletters” Grab Hyperengaged Audiences

All that time and effort for an open rate of 20 percent hardly seems worth it, does it? Newsletter marketing might be experiencing a renaissance, but so much of it sticks to a tried-and-true formula: regular drops, same template, point to content available on your hub. Not that there’s anything wrong with that; it’s tried-and-true for a reason. But is it really maximizing the impact of your fantastic brand storytelling? Continue reading “How Targeted “Pop-Up Newsletters” Grab Hyperengaged Audiences”

Bronze beats gold in open access: implications for data re-use

Bronze open access.jpg

Support for the open access (OA) movement is increasing, yet the majority of OA articles do not have a license that permits free re-use of contents, and so do not fully comply with the 2002 Budapest OA Initiative (BOAI) definition of OA. In a recent study by Piwowar et al, representative samples were taken from the online databases Crossref, Web of Science and Unpaywall (100,000 articles from each) to determine the prevalence and type of OA publications. Importantly, this involved categorisation of articles as follows:

  • gold OA – published in an OA journal indexed by the Directory of OA Journals (DOAJ)
  • green OA – paid-for access via the publisher’s webpage but free access in an OA repository
  • hybrid OA – OA in a journal that also publishes non-OA articles
  • ‘bronze’ OA – free to read on the publisher’s webpage but without a license permitting free re-use of content
  • closed access – all other articles.

The most common form of OA was ‘bronze’. This may have implications for research; the lack of a license permitting the free re-use of an article’s contents can substantially restrict the impact of the data therein, for example by preventing other groups from conducting further analyses. In a recent Nature Index article, Piwowar notes that in the current age of machine learning and ‘big data’, it is especially important that data are freely available for computational analysis. Overall, the study found that 47% of articles were OA in 2015 (the most recent year of analysis), and the authors predict that all articles could be OA by 2040. Despite this encouraging forecast, the future of OA may be less bright if bronze OA continues to prevail.

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Summary by Emma Prest PhD from Aspire Scientific


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The post Bronze beats gold in open access: implications for data re-use appeared first on The Publication Plan for everyone interested in medical writing, the development of medical publications, and publication planning.

Slides from my keynote on how we have failed our users in access to content, challenges around and disocvery, and a bit about the response ‘Everything Available’: http://bit.ly/2HY6Nop 

French media is in talks about collaborating on a unified login system

Concerns about the looming ePrivacy Regulation, not to mention fear of the duopoly, are prompting European publishers to collaborate on joint consumer login systems. So far, Germany and Portugal have led the charge. Now, it looks like France could join the fray.

Leading national newspapers Le Monde, Le Figaro and Le Parisien are among the publishers discussing the potential for implementing a common single login across their sites, through which users can be automatically authenticated each time they visit one of the publishers’ sites. Continue reading “French media is in talks about collaborating on a unified login system”

ADS THAT DON’T OVERSTEP

Recent research reveals that digital targeting improves ad performance. But there’s a fine line between creepy and delightful, says HBS professor Leslie K. John. As targeted advertising becomes more sophisticated—and people become more aware of how their privacy can be compromised—offering them meaningful control over their personal information is critical. This Harvard Business Review article outlines five steps that digital marketers can take to create personalized ads that generate customer value instead of a consumer backlash.

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Lessons Learned from the Quartz Email Team

An interview with Eva ScazzeroJessanne Collins, and Adam Pasick of Quartz.

Including an awesome range of elements (animated GIFs, infographics, videos, and embedded surveys and quizzes), Quartz delivers some of the most engaging and interactive newsletters we’ve ever seen. Design-wise, they’re clean and consistent. Content-wise, they’re smart, relevant, and well-written. And the topics of their Obsession emails are random and nerdy enough to give you a killer edge at trivia night.

Gamifying their newsletter has yielded tremendous results: growing to 700,000 subscribers, they doubled the size of their subscriber base in 2017. ….

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Using behavioural economics to convey the value of paid app subscriptions

Tips to better convert free users into subscribers

One key challenge subscription businesses face is that many users don’t perceive the value of paying. Google Play teamed up with The Behavioural Architects to explore how behavioural economics (BE) can be used to better communicate to free users the value of upgrading to paid app subscriptions. Continue reading “Using behavioural economics to convey the value of paid app subscriptions”

Google details how Chrome will block ads


As planned, Google Chrome will start blocking ads on February 15. The company today shared more details on how this feature will work when it’s turned on tomorrow.

Google last year joined the Coalition for Better Ads, a group that offers specific standards for how the industry should improve ads for consumers. The company then revealed that Chrome will stop showing all ads (including those owned or served by Google) on websites that display non-compliant ads, as defined by the coalition. Continue reading “Google details how Chrome will block ads”

How Swedish tabloid Aftonbladet reached 250,000 digital subscribers

Swedish national tabloid Aftonbladet has become one of Europe’s biggest digital-subscriptions success stories.

The newspaper, owned by Scandinavian media giant Schibsted, has amassed 250,000 digital subscribers (at $7-$12 a month) since launching its digital subscriptions program in 2003, a lofty figure given Sweden’s population of 10 million. Aftonbladet made 255 million Swedish krona ($32 million) in profit in 2017, driven by both advertising and subscriptions, according to its latest financials released last week. Continue reading “How Swedish tabloid Aftonbladet reached 250,000 digital subscribers”

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