Early adopters of the OpenCitations Data Model

OpenCitations is very pleased to announce its collaboration with four new scholarly Research and Development projects that are early adopters of the recently updated OpenCitations Data Model, described in this blog post.

The four projects are similar, in that they each are independently using text mining and optical character recognition or PDF extraction techniques to extract citation information from the reference lists of published works, and are making these citations available as Linked Open Data. Three of the four will also use the OpenCitations Corpus as publication platform for their citation data.  The academic disciplines from which these citation data are being extracted are social science, humanities and economics. Continue reading “Early adopters of the OpenCitations Data Model”

Microsoft and Tsinghua University Work Together on Open Academic Data Research

In a recent collaboration, Microsoft and China’s Tsinghua University released an academic graph, named Open Academic Graph (OAG). This billion-scale academic graph integrates the current Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG) and Tsinghua’s AMiner academic graph. Specifically, it contains the metadata information of 155 million academic paper metadata from AMiner and 166 million papers from MAG. By consolidating metadata information of each, it generates nearly 65 million matching relationships between the two academic graphs [1].

Picture 1: Connections between Tsinghua University AMiner and Microsoft Academic Graph

Continue reading “Microsoft and Tsinghua University Work Together on Open Academic Data Research”

Spotlight on data journalism

Making our data journalism stand out on social media

Here’s some we prepared earlier

The stories produced by The Economist’s data team attract a lot of readers. Some of the team’s most popular pieces include our own glass ceiling index and a daily chart about the most dangerous cities in the world. It didn’t come as a surprise that, when we asked our readers what content they wanted to see more of, they said data journalism. So we decided to take two main steps to meet this demand. Continue reading “Spotlight on data journalism”

Citations as First-Class Data Entities: The OpenCitations Data Model

Requirements for citations to be treated as First-Class Data Entities

In my introductory blog post, I listed five requirements for the treatment of citations as first-class data entities.  The second of these requirements is that they must have metadata structured using a generic yet appropriately detailed data model.

To fulfil that requirement, OpenCitations is pleased to announce the publication on 13 February 2018 of the OpenCitations Data Model, v1.6 [1].  This replaces the previous version, v1.5.3, published on 13 July 2016. Continue reading “Citations as First-Class Data Entities: The OpenCitations Data Model”

Citations as First-Class Data Entities: Introduction

Citations are now centre stage

As a result of the Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC), launched on April 6 last year, almost all the major scholarly publishers now open the reference lists they submit to Crossref, resulting in more than half a billion references being openly available via the Crossref API.

It is therefore time to think carefully about how citations are treated, and how they might be better handled as part of the Linked Open Data Web. Continue reading “Citations as First-Class Data Entities: Introduction”

Open science: University of Toronto researchers to publish lab notes in real time

About 20 scientists affiliated with a University of Toronto research organization have agreed to publish their lab notes in real time, a groundbreaking move aimed at hastening the discovery of new medical treatments.

The researchers, who work on some of the most untreatable diseases, such as ALS and rare children’s brain tumors, are part of the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), which has laboratories  at U of T and McGill University in Canada, and laboratories in Europe, the U.S. and South America.

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Improving AI Systems with Human Feedback and no Heartburn

Humans play an indispensable role in many modern AI-enabled services – not just as consumers of the service, but as the actual intelligence behind the artificial intelligence. From news portals to e-commerce websites, it is people’s ratings, clicks, and other interactions which provide a teaching signal used by the underlying intelligent systems to learn. While these human-in-the-loop systems improve through user interaction over time, they must also provide enough short-term benefit to people to be helpful. Continue reading “Improving AI Systems with Human Feedback and no Heartburn”

Getting Linked In to Data Science with Dr. Igor Perisic

Dr. Igor Perisic – Chief Data Officer

Episode 11, February 7, 2018

Getting Linked In to Data Science with Dr. Igor Perisic

Big data is a big deal, and if you follow the popular technical press, you’ll have heard all the metaphors: data is the new oil, the new bacon, the new currency, the new electricity. It’s even been called the new black. While data may not actually be any of these things, we can say this: in today’s networked world, data is increasingly valuable, and it is essential to research, both basic and applied. Continue reading “Getting Linked In to Data Science with Dr. Igor Perisic”

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