Citations as First-Class Data Entities: Introduction

Citations are now centre stage

As a result of the Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC), launched on April 6 last year, almost all the major scholarly publishers now open the reference lists they submit to Crossref, resulting in more than half a billion references being openly available via the Crossref API.

It is therefore time to think carefully about how citations are treated, and how they might be better handled as part of the Linked Open Data Web. Continue reading “Citations as First-Class Data Entities: Introduction”

Open science: University of Toronto researchers to publish lab notes in real time

About 20 scientists affiliated with a University of Toronto research organization have agreed to publish their lab notes in real time, a groundbreaking move aimed at hastening the discovery of new medical treatments.

The researchers, who work on some of the most untreatable diseases, such as ALS and rare children’s brain tumors, are part of the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), which has laboratories  at U of T and McGill University in Canada, and laboratories in Europe, the U.S. and South America.

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OpenCitations and the Initiative for Open Citations: A Clarification

Some folk are confused, but OpenCitations and the Initiative for Open Citations, despite the similarity of their names, are two distinct organizations.

OpenCitations (http://opencitations.net) is an open scholarly infrastructure organization directed by Silvio Peroni and myself, and its primary purpose is to host and build the OpenCitations Corpus (OCC), an RDF database of scholarly citation data that now contains almost 13 million citation links. Continue reading “OpenCitations and the Initiative for Open Citations: A Clarification”

NIH’s Data Commons Pilot project seeks to break down barriers in biomedical research

“Ten years from now, I expect biomedical research will look much different than it does today. I expect researchers will be able to tap a wide range of data streams, which will not only be accessible, they will all be in a format that can be easily shared and reused. By building upon each other’s data, researchers will be able to collectively accelerate biomedical discovery.”

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