How best to fund knowledgebases – an author and reviewer in conversation

A recent Research Article published by Chiara Gabella (CG), SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, and colleagues explored how best to fund knowledgebases, which are relied on by many life scientists as highly accurate and reliable sources of scientific information. There are many questions about how to fund these, in her article Chiara uses UniProtKB as a case study, a knowledgebase run by the UniProt Consortium – a collaboration between the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and the Protein Information Resource (PIR). Chiara’s article was openly reviewed by Helen Berman (HB),  Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, who also works on a knowledge base – the RCSB Protein Data Bank

Continue reading “How best to fund knowledgebases – an author and reviewer in conversation”

The new podcast is here, and just in time for your commute. Don’t miss a chance to hear from Ruth Pickering about how @DoYewno is helping others uncover the undiscovered faster with AI and neural networking. https://blog.outsellinc.com/uncovering-the-undiscovered-faster-with-ai-and-neural-networking-e02eb28dc1b3 …

The new podcast is here, and just in time for your commute. Don’t miss a chance to hear from Ruth Pickering about how is helping others uncover the undiscovered faster with AI and neural networking. https://blog.outsellinc.com/uncovering-the-undiscovered-faster-with-ai-and-neural-networking-e02eb28dc1b3 …

Text-as-data journalism? Highlights from a decade of SOTU speech coverage

January 2012: The National Post’s graphics team analyzes keywords used in State of the Union addresses by presidents Bush and Obama / Image: © Richard Johnson/The National Post

In a guest post for OJB, Barbara Maseda looks at how the media has used text-as-data to cover State of the Union addresses over the last decade. Continue reading “Text-as-data journalism? Highlights from a decade of SOTU speech coverage”

Trinity Mirror data unit weekly review: why simple interactives are often the best

Okay, it’s a fortnightly review. I wasn’t around last Friday.

We start with a couple of interactives built by the unit. The first was to go with the newly-released Welsh colour-banded school ratings. It didn’t aim to do much: just let parents find their children’s school, and ones nearby, as quickly as possible, and see their results. Continue reading “Trinity Mirror data unit weekly review: why simple interactives are often the best”

With ePrivacy looming, German publishers scramble to get users logged in

The looming ePrivacy Regulation is creating a new battleground in Europe: the race to own consumer login systems, for better or worse.

When and how publishers arrive there depends on their business models and markets. But in Germany, the login strategy is a tactic many are adopting to ensure their business’ sustainability, should they have to abide by the proposed ePrivacy law and gain consumer consent for all cookie use. Continue reading “With ePrivacy looming, German publishers scramble to get users logged in”

OpenCitations and the Initiative for Open Citations: A Clarification

Some folk are confused, but OpenCitations and the Initiative for Open Citations, despite the similarity of their names, are two distinct organizations.

OpenCitations (http://opencitations.net) is an open scholarly infrastructure organization directed by Silvio Peroni and myself, and its primary purpose is to host and build the OpenCitations Corpus (OCC), an RDF database of scholarly citation data that now contains almost 13 million citation links. Continue reading “OpenCitations and the Initiative for Open Citations: A Clarification”

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