Trinity Mirror data unit weekly review: why simple interactives are often the best

Okay, it’s a fortnightly review. I wasn’t around last Friday.

We start with a couple of interactives built by the unit. The first was to go with the newly-released Welsh colour-banded school ratings. It didn’t aim to do much: just let parents find their children’s school, and ones nearby, as quickly as possible, and see their results. Continue reading “Trinity Mirror data unit weekly review: why simple interactives are often the best”

With ePrivacy looming, German publishers scramble to get users logged in

The looming ePrivacy Regulation is creating a new battleground in Europe: the race to own consumer login systems, for better or worse.

When and how publishers arrive there depends on their business models and markets. But in Germany, the login strategy is a tactic many are adopting to ensure their business’ sustainability, should they have to abide by the proposed ePrivacy law and gain consumer consent for all cookie use. Continue reading “With ePrivacy looming, German publishers scramble to get users logged in”

OpenCitations and the Initiative for Open Citations: A Clarification

Some folk are confused, but OpenCitations and the Initiative for Open Citations, despite the similarity of their names, are two distinct organizations.

OpenCitations (http://opencitations.net) is an open scholarly infrastructure organization directed by Silvio Peroni and myself, and its primary purpose is to host and build the OpenCitations Corpus (OCC), an RDF database of scholarly citation data that now contains almost 13 million citation links. Continue reading “OpenCitations and the Initiative for Open Citations: A Clarification”

NIH’s Data Commons Pilot project seeks to break down barriers in biomedical research

“Ten years from now, I expect biomedical research will look much different than it does today. I expect researchers will be able to tap a wide range of data streams, which will not only be accessible, they will all be in a format that can be easily shared and reused. By building upon each other’s data, researchers will be able to collectively accelerate biomedical discovery.”

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Understanding the implications of Open Citations – how far along are we?

The academic discovery space seems to be buzzing again. This space has become relatively stable after the introduction and maturity of Web Scale Discovery between 2009-2013, but things seem to be hotting up once again.

With the recent interest in integrating discovery of open access, as well as linked data (with a dash of machine learning and text mining)  we have the beginnings of an interesting situation. A third development which was harder to forsee is the rise in Open Citation movement which I will focus on in this post. Continue reading “Understanding the implications of Open Citations – how far along are we?”

How the practice of design enhances artificial intelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems can perform amazing feats of problem-solving. But no matter how accurate AI solutions are, they won’t be relevant, insightful and adopted by people without great design work.

The practice of design is about problem solving. It starts long before the visual look and feel is created and continues long afterward. It creates a vital connection between humans and machines that allows AI systems to perform at their best.

In this article, I’ll focus on discrete cognitive machine tools and systems built for specific tasks, rather than Artificial General Intelligence. Continue reading “How the practice of design enhances artificial intelligence”

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