Digiday Research: Where publishers get their video revenues

At the Digiday Video Summit last month in Scottsdale, Arizona, we sat down with 51 publisher executives to learn about social platforms’ contributions to their video revenues. Check out our research on publishers’ growing concerns about their ability to monetize content for over-the-top services here. Learn more about our upcoming events here. Continue reading “Digiday Research: Where publishers get their video revenues”

How Viacom uses artificial intelligence to predict the success of its social campaigns

To eliminate some of the guesswork from its social media campaigns, Viacom has turned to machines.

Over the past year, a seven-person data science team in Viacom’s ad sales group has been building a pipeline to collect near-real time information about how its social media posts perform. This way, the entertainment giant can predict how many social posts it will need to reach audience goals and what kinds of posts to use in each campaign. Continue reading “How Viacom uses artificial intelligence to predict the success of its social campaigns”

Subscription publishers (still) have platform problems

Platforms played integral roles in helping publishers scale audiences. Now, they’re helping with publishers’ subscription ambitions, with new product features and programs to educate publishers just starting to pursue consumer revenue.

While publishers are heartened by these steps, many are wary. Not only do platforms have a history of changing their minds about how their products work, they are also limited in their ability to help publishers’ subscription efforts. Here is a rundown of what the platforms have done and the gripes that publishers still have with them. Continue reading “Subscription publishers (still) have platform problems”

As @risj_oxford prepares to launch the 2018 Digital News Report, it seems a good time to revisit Journalism, Media and Technology Trends and Predictions, by @nicnewman January 2018,… How is it going so far?

As prepares to launch the 2018 Digital News Report, it seems a good time to revisit Journalism, Media and Technology Trends and Predictions, by January 2018,… How is it going so far? Which trends are here to stay? https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/our-research/journalism-media-and-technology-trends-and-predictions-2018 …

A new app for The Economist

Serving readers the stories they want, when and how they want them

I am delighted to tell you about the new mobile app for The Economist, which we have just released for iPhone and iPad. It is the first major change to The Economist on mobile in almost eight years: when the original Digital Editions Economist app was released in 2010 the iPad was brand new, and at that stage the success of the iPhone and its app ecosystem was not yet guaranteed. Continue reading “A new app for The Economist”

How The Economist’s new app tries to keep people from unsubscribing

To grow reader revenue, publishers are increasingly putting customers at the center of their organizations to drive subscriptions and retention.

For the past eight months, The Economist has worked to drive retention, as it’s cheaper to keep readers than to acquire new ones. Case in point is its new Economist app, which went live May 2 and is free to download, but requires a subscription to access articles. Continue reading “How The Economist’s new app tries to keep people from unsubscribing”

‘A massive scramble’: Candid thoughts of marketers on GDPR fallout

Data privacy and getting compliant in time for the General Data Protection Regulation was a hotly debated topic for marketers attending the Digiday Programmatic Marketing Summit Europe in Estoril, Portugal, this week.

With less than a month to go until the deadline for GDPR enforcement, uncertainty around who in the supply chain will be held responsible should regulators decide to prosecute remains top of mind. We’ve collected some of the main concerns that attendees talked about throughout the week — under condition of anonymity — to give a flavor of what execs across the digital ad industry are truly thinking. Continue reading “‘A massive scramble’: Candid thoughts of marketers on GDPR fallout”

‘We want publishers to think the unthinkable’: How Axel Springer is reducing its reliance on Google ad tech

Axel Springer is on a mission to cut down on its dependence on Google ad tech — and it’s making progress.

In January, the German digital media giant, owner of Business Insider, Bild and other titles, completed the shift from its former waterfall-based ad tech stack used with Google in favor of using AppNexus as its ad server, into which it can plug in a variety of demand partners (including Google). It’s a strategy it began last spring. The result: Programmatic revenues rose 10 percent compared to the same period last year, while eCPMs jumped 28 percent. The publisher won’t disclose what percentage of its digital ad revenue comes from programmatically bought ads. Continue reading “‘We want publishers to think the unthinkable’: How Axel Springer is reducing its reliance on Google ad tech”

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