Publons launches reviewer search and matchmaking tool, Publons Reviewer Connect

– the scholarly peer review platform – has launched , a reviewer search and matchmaking tool to enable journal editors to confidently and reliably find, screen, and connect with reviewers. The AI-powered technology combines Publons’ cross-publisher peer review platform of more than 400k reviewers with Web of Science – the world’s largest curated author and citation database to deliver a high number of precise recommendations from more than seven million authors.

What we read this week (6 July 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing and Open Science

Slate discuss the impact of Facebook’s retreat from the news business.

There’s a great quote in this article:

“The internet is a completely different place every 18 months, and that’s been true since we launched in 1996,”

Continue reading “What we read this week (6 July 2018)”

Subscription publishers (still) have platform problems

Platforms played integral roles in helping publishers scale audiences. Now, they’re helping with publishers’ subscription ambitions, with new product features and programs to educate publishers just starting to pursue consumer revenue.

While publishers are heartened by these steps, many are wary. Not only do platforms have a history of changing their minds about how their products work, they are also limited in their ability to help publishers’ subscription efforts. Here is a rundown of what the platforms have done and the gripes that publishers still have with them. Continue reading “Subscription publishers (still) have platform problems”

Annotations are an easy way to Show Your Work

Journalists are increasingly being asked to show their work. Politifact does it like this. This is great! The more citation of sources, the better. If I want to check those sources, though, I often wind up spending a lot of time searching with cited articles to find passages cited implicitly but not explicitly. If those passages are marked using annotations, the method I’ll describe here can streamline the reader’s experience. Continue reading “Annotations are an easy way to Show Your Work”

Understanding the implications of Open Citations — how far along are we?

Understanding the implications of Open Citations — how far along are we?

The academic discovery space seems to be buzzing again. This space has become relatively stable after the introduction and maturity of Web Scale Discovery between 2009–2013, but things seem to be hotting up once again. Continue reading “Understanding the implications of Open Citations — how far along are we?”

What we read this week (27 April 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. It’s an eclectic mix this week:

Publishing:

We’re really interested to see how the FT’s experiment with :CRUX to use Knowledge Acquisition as an approach to content recommendation will work out. We could see this approach working well for some of our audience segments.

Continue reading “What we read this week (27 April 2018)”

How Important is Data Curation? Gaps and Opportunities for Academic Libraries

INTRODUCTION Data curation may be an emerging service for academic libraries, but researchers actively “curate” their data in a number of ways—even if terminology may not always align. Building on past userneeds assessments performed via survey and focus groups, the authors sought direct input from researchers on the importance and utilization of specific data curation activities. METHODS Between October 21, 2016, and November 18, 2016, the study team held focus groups with 91 participants at six different academic institutions to determine which data curation activities were most important to researchers, which activities were currently underway for their data, and how satisfied they were with the results. RESULTS Researchers are actively engaged in a variety of data curation activities, and while they considered most data curation activities to be highly important, a majority of the sample reported dissatisfaction with the current state of data curation at their institution. DISCUSSION Our findings demonstrate specific gaps and opportunities for academic libraries to focus their data curation services to more effectively meet researcher needs. CONCLUSION Research libraries stand to benefit their users by emphasizing, investing in, and/or heavily promoting the highly valued services that may not currently be in use by many researchers. Published on 2018-04-26 21:11:38

A new series from The BMJ highlights unreported trials

The BMJ highlights unreported clinical trialsThe FDA Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA) and the “Final Rule” define the global ethical obligation to report the results of all clinical trials within a reasonable timeframe. However, the lack of reporting of clinical trials is still a prominent issue, with potential implications for treatment decisions and patient care. Last month, The BMJ unveiled a new, regular feature that intends to publicise unreported trials to encourage their reporting. Brief summaries in this series, published once per week, will highlight individual, unreported trials, the results of which may have important clinical relevance.

‘Unreported trials of the week’ will be selected using TrialsTracker. Launched by the AllTrials campaign, this FDAAA compliance tracking tool tracks trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov and those that breach the FDAAA. At the time of writing, this tool identified 35% of trials as having unreported results.

The weekly series has already gone live; the first feature described an unreported study on analgesics for postoperative pain following the extraction of wisdom teeth. The feature’s authors, Nicholas J DeVito and Ben Goldacre, hope that the series will spark productive discussions focussed on improving reporting rates.

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Summary by Emma Prest PhD from Aspire Scientific


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The post A new series from The BMJ highlights unreported trials appeared first on The Publication Plan for everyone interested in medical writing, the development of medical publications, and publication planning.

Do preprints have a place in today’s reference lists?

Do preprints have a place in todays’ reference lists TransparencyThe use of preprints (a research paper made publicly available before publication in a peer reviewed journal) is on the rise in the biomedical field. In an article in The Scholarly Kitchen, David Crotty asks whether preprints should be cited in the same way as articles published in a peer reviewed journal. While discussing the pros and cons of using preprints, the author recognises the need for clear citation guidelines. He concludes that publishers will need to play an active role in establishing a broadly accepted standard to “preserve quality, transparency and trustworthiness of scholarly literature”. Continue reading “Do preprints have a place in today’s reference lists?”

Bronze beats gold in open access: implications for data re-use

Bronze open access.jpg

Support for the open access (OA) movement is increasing, yet the majority of OA articles do not have a license that permits free re-use of contents, and so do not fully comply with the 2002 Budapest OA Initiative (BOAI) definition of OA. In a recent study by Piwowar et al, representative samples were taken from the online databases Crossref, Web of Science and Unpaywall (100,000 articles from each) to determine the prevalence and type of OA publications. Importantly, this involved categorisation of articles as follows:

  • gold OA – published in an OA journal indexed by the Directory of OA Journals (DOAJ)
  • green OA – paid-for access via the publisher’s webpage but free access in an OA repository
  • hybrid OA – OA in a journal that also publishes non-OA articles
  • ‘bronze’ OA – free to read on the publisher’s webpage but without a license permitting free re-use of content
  • closed access – all other articles.

The most common form of OA was ‘bronze’. This may have implications for research; the lack of a license permitting the free re-use of an article’s contents can substantially restrict the impact of the data therein, for example by preventing other groups from conducting further analyses. In a recent Nature Index article, Piwowar notes that in the current age of machine learning and ‘big data’, it is especially important that data are freely available for computational analysis. Overall, the study found that 47% of articles were OA in 2015 (the most recent year of analysis), and the authors predict that all articles could be OA by 2040. Despite this encouraging forecast, the future of OA may be less bright if bronze OA continues to prevail.

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Summary by Emma Prest PhD from Aspire Scientific


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The post Bronze beats gold in open access: implications for data re-use appeared first on The Publication Plan for everyone interested in medical writing, the development of medical publications, and publication planning.

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