The HighWire blog has moved

The HighWire blog has moved to a new location:

https://www.highwirepress.com/thought-leadership

The above link will take you to the list of the latest posts, with a filter on the right so you can include only material you are interested in.   E.g., clicking the “[ ] Article” filter essentially shows you the type of material that was found on the old blog.

The most recent item on the new blog is: “12 must-know trends in scholarly research and the research communication ecosystem

Has the tide turned? A new culture for Responsible Metrics is on the horizon

Katrine Sundsbø reflects on the UK Forum for Responsible Metrics event, held on the 7th February 2018.

The topic ‘responsible metrics’ has gone from hot to boiling after RCUK signed DORA(San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment) Wednesday 7th February. This means that they, as a funding organisation, are committing to good practice in regards to the use of metrics in research assessment. The timing of the event by UK Forum for Responsible Metrics on Thursday 8th February could therefore not have been better.

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TechBlog: eLife replaces commenting system with Hypothesis annotations

The next time you feel moved to comment on an article in the open-access online journal eLife, be prepared for a different user experience. On 31 January, eLife announced it had adopted the open-source annotation service, Hypothesis, replacing its traditional commenting system. That’s the result of a year-long effort between the two services to make Hypothesis more amenable to the scholarly publishing community.

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Crypto Canon

Here’s a list — building on and including Chris’ last roundup — of crypto readings and resources. It’s organized from building blocks and basics; foundations (& history); and key concepts and beginners’ guides — followed by specific topics such as governance; privacy and security; scaling; consensus; cryptoeconomics and investing; fundraising and token distribution; decentralized exchanges; stablecoins; and cryptoeconomic primitives (crytocollectibles, curation markets, games). We also included a section with developer tutorials, practical guides, and maker stories — as well as other resources, such as newsletters and courses, at the end.

We’ll soon be updating this regularly at crypto.a16z.com, for now we’ll keep it updated here. You can also find most of a16z’s writings, posts, and videos on the topic at a16z.com/crypto.

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Kudos launching new dissemination management and impact acceleration services

Research groups, departments, impact leads and units of assessment invited to join early access program

For immediate release, February 13th, 2018 –– Kudos, the award-winning service for maximizing the reach and impact of research publications, is launching a new dissemination management toolkit for research groups, university departments and REF Units of Assessment. Through this new service, research groups will be able to plan, action and report on a wide range of outreach activities for key outputs and projects, helping build a broad and international audience for their work, and accelerating its impact. Continue reading “Kudos launching new dissemination management and impact acceleration services”

How to launch a transformative and sustainable forum for publication and scholarly critiques of research in the life sciences?

By Harinder Singh Director, Division of Immunobiology and the Center for Systems Immunology Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center This perspective is a result of the various insightful commentaries that have been posted on the ASAPbio site in the context of the HHMI/Wellcome/ASAPbio meeting on “Transparency, Recognition and Innovation in Peer Review in the Life Sciences.” […]

Copyright and systematic reviews: do researchers have to break the rules to produce good quality research?

Jane Falconer is a medical librarian with over 20 years experience in medical charities, the NHS and Higher Education. She is currently the User Support Services Librarian at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, responsible for all user-facing library services, including user training and support, membership, access and enquiry support, reading lists, interlibrary loans and liaison services. She also provides literature searching support for systematic reviews, she has created and run the searches on a number of projects including the Lancet Commission on Planetary Health and the WHO Guidelines on Heptatitis B and C Testing. ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7329-0577. Jane got in touch via Twitter as she was frustrated by copyright laws that prevented her sharing medical articles with researchers around the world. Here’s what she told us…..

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What we read this week (9 Feb 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. Check back every Friday for a new post.

Voice UI

Voice UI is definitely coming but the big question is what will researchers use it for? We have plenty of anecdotal evidence that users are listening to academic articles via a range of apps and browser functionality . BMJ is experimenting with voice driven interactions but even simple things like indexing the BMJ in TuneIn to allow users to ask Alexa to play them has proved tricky. “Alexa play Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery podcast” usually works but “Alexa play Heart podcast” isn’t going to bring up the Heart Journal podcast – especially near Valentine’s Day! Continue reading “What we read this week (9 Feb 2018)”

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