Quickly flip through papers on your phone

Today, we are making it easier to use your phone to find and scan scholarly articles. Clicking a Scholar search result on your phone now opens a quick preview:

You can swipe left and right to quickly flip through the list of results. Where available, you can read abstracts. Or explore related and citing articles, which appear at the bottom of the preview along with other familiar Scholar features.

When you find an interesting article, you can click through to read it immediately, or you can tap the star icon to save it for later in your Scholar library. You’ll need to sign in to the same Google account on both the phone and the laptop to use this feature. This lets you find and save papers on your phone wherever you are. Once you get home, you can grab a cup of coffee and click “My library” on your laptop to get to your reading list.

Quick previews are available in Chrome, Safari, Samsung, and other standard browsers on recent Android and Apple phones. Sorry, they won’t work in Opera Mini or other special-purpose browsers; and they are not, at this time, available on tablets.

We would like to thank our partners in scholarly publishing that have worked with us on this. Working together, we hope to help make research more efficient everywhere.

Posted by: Alex Verstak, Software Engineer

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The holy grail in Open Access: sharing that benefits authors

The holy grail of Open Access: sharing that benefits authors

As a researcher, you are often urged to make your work openly accessible. And sure, that’s a laudable goal, but… What’s in it for you?

With job prospects in academia being not that rosy, it is no surprise that open access is not the primary consideration for researchers considering where to get their work published. When push comes to shove, making a living is more important than access to your research.

But why not both? You can give yourself that career boost and support open access. Continue reading “The holy grail in Open Access: sharing that benefits authors”

Building trust through badging

Anisa Rowhani-Farid and Adrian Barnett recently published the second version of their Research Article in which they compared data-sharing in two journals and whether badges was associated with increased sharing. In this guest blog, Anisa Rowhani-Farid describes what motivated her in her work and the results of her research.

Prior to the appearance of scientific journals in the 17th century, researchers were hesitant to share their findings with others. The pace of scientific advancement, however, changed radically with the establishment of the printing press which led to the development of scientific journals in 1665 when Henry Oldenburg of the Royal Academy of Sciences launched the publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Academy of Sciences. When the Royal Society was established in 1660 it had the motto Nullius in verba, which means ‘take nobody’s word for it’. From the very beginning, science was about verifying facts, it was about being open with data.

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What we read this week (16 March 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. Check back every Friday for a new post.

  • Effective Social Media Strategies for Publishers Webinar
    Altmetric sponsored webinar discussing practical social media tips & tricks for publishers. Speakers include Phaedra Cress, Altmetric Ambassador and Executive Editor of the Aesthetic Surgery Journal, and Steve Dudley, Chief Operations Officer at the British Ornithologists Union and co-author of ‘Tweeting birds: online mentions predict future citations in ornithology’

Continue reading “What we read this week (16 March 2018)”

What we read this week (9 March 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. Check back every Friday for a new post.

Visit Pubtechgator to find more publishing technology news stories.

What we read this week (2 March 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. Check back every Friday for a new post.

 

Visit Pubtechgator to find more publishing technology news stories.

PLOS Collaborates on Recommendations to Improve Transparency for Author Contributions

In a new report, a group convened by the US National Academy of Sciences and including a dozen journal editors reflects on authorship guidelines and recommends new ways to make author contributions more transparent.

What does it mean to be author number seven on a twenty-five–author article?

Establishing transparency for each author’s role in a research study is one of the recommendations in a report published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) by a group led by Marcia McNutt, President of the National Academy of Sciences. The recommendations issued by this group, which included one of us, were adapted based on community feedback and peer review from an original draft presented as a preprint. PLOS supports the recommendations for increased transparency and has already put some of them in practice. Continue reading “PLOS Collaborates on Recommendations to Improve Transparency for Author Contributions”

The evolving librarian – reconsidering teaching of boolean, CRAAP for fake news and calculating open adjusted cost per use

Life and libraries is always changing and evolving. A lot of our standard practices date back decades, but as the environment changes, we librarians should always consider if our tools or practices are in the need of a change or if they can be reused to tackle the same problem in a different form.
I’ve recently being inspired by the arguments and evidence from various blog  posts and articles to reconsider or consider the following
  • The effectiveness of teaching of Boolean particularly to first years
  • Teaching CRAAP test as a tool to spot and handle fake news
  • Using of levels of open access to adjust cost per use

Continue reading “The evolving librarian – reconsidering teaching of boolean, CRAAP for fake news and calculating open adjusted cost per use”

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