What we read this week (16 March 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. Check back every Friday for a new post.

  • Effective Social Media Strategies for Publishers Webinar
    Altmetric sponsored webinar discussing practical social media tips & tricks for publishers. Speakers include Phaedra Cress, Altmetric Ambassador and Executive Editor of the Aesthetic Surgery Journal, and Steve Dudley, Chief Operations Officer at the British Ornithologists Union and co-author of ‘Tweeting birds: online mentions predict future citations in ornithology’

Continue reading “What we read this week (16 March 2018)”

What we read this week (9 March 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. Check back every Friday for a new post.

Visit Pubtechgator to find more publishing technology news stories.

What we read this week (2 March 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. Check back every Friday for a new post.

 

Visit Pubtechgator to find more publishing technology news stories.

PLOS Collaborates on Recommendations to Improve Transparency for Author Contributions

In a new report, a group convened by the US National Academy of Sciences and including a dozen journal editors reflects on authorship guidelines and recommends new ways to make author contributions more transparent.

What does it mean to be author number seven on a twenty-five–author article?

Establishing transparency for each author’s role in a research study is one of the recommendations in a report published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) by a group led by Marcia McNutt, President of the National Academy of Sciences. The recommendations issued by this group, which included one of us, were adapted based on community feedback and peer review from an original draft presented as a preprint. PLOS supports the recommendations for increased transparency and has already put some of them in practice. Continue reading “PLOS Collaborates on Recommendations to Improve Transparency for Author Contributions”

The evolving librarian – reconsidering teaching of boolean, CRAAP for fake news and calculating open adjusted cost per use

Life and libraries is always changing and evolving. A lot of our standard practices date back decades, but as the environment changes, we librarians should always consider if our tools or practices are in the need of a change or if they can be reused to tackle the same problem in a different form.
I’ve recently being inspired by the arguments and evidence from various blog  posts and articles to reconsider or consider the following
  • The effectiveness of teaching of Boolean particularly to first years
  • Teaching CRAAP test as a tool to spot and handle fake news
  • Using of levels of open access to adjust cost per use

Continue reading “The evolving librarian – reconsidering teaching of boolean, CRAAP for fake news and calculating open adjusted cost per use”

Atypon’s Artificial Intelligence R&D Fuels Four More BioASQ Awards in Semantic Technologies

February 21, 2018 – Santa Clara, CA – For the fifth year in a row, Atypon has placed in the widely respected International BioASQ Awards competition. Atypon’s ongoing research and development (R&D) into artificial intelligence technologies led to four awards for four different semantic technology categories in the 2017 BioASQ Challenge. Continue reading “Atypon’s Artificial Intelligence R&D Fuels Four More BioASQ Awards in Semantic Technologies”

The HighWire blog has moved

The HighWire blog has moved to a new location:

https://www.highwirepress.com/thought-leadership

The above link will take you to the list of the latest posts, with a filter on the right so you can include only material you are interested in.   E.g., clicking the “[ ] Article” filter essentially shows you the type of material that was found on the old blog.

The most recent item on the new blog is: “12 must-know trends in scholarly research and the research communication ecosystem

Has the tide turned? A new culture for Responsible Metrics is on the horizon

Katrine Sundsbø reflects on the UK Forum for Responsible Metrics event, held on the 7th February 2018.

The topic ‘responsible metrics’ has gone from hot to boiling after RCUK signed DORA(San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment) Wednesday 7th February. This means that they, as a funding organisation, are committing to good practice in regards to the use of metrics in research assessment. The timing of the event by UK Forum for Responsible Metrics on Thursday 8th February could therefore not have been better.

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TechBlog: eLife replaces commenting system with Hypothesis annotations

The next time you feel moved to comment on an article in the open-access online journal eLife, be prepared for a different user experience. On 31 January, eLife announced it had adopted the open-source annotation service, Hypothesis, replacing its traditional commenting system. That’s the result of a year-long effort between the two services to make Hypothesis more amenable to the scholarly publishing community.

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