Kudos launching new dissemination management and impact acceleration services

Research groups, departments, impact leads and units of assessment invited to join early access program

For immediate release, February 13th, 2018 –– Kudos, the award-winning service for maximizing the reach and impact of research publications, is launching a new dissemination management toolkit for research groups, university departments and REF Units of Assessment. Through this new service, research groups will be able to plan, action and report on a wide range of outreach activities for key outputs and projects, helping build a broad and international audience for their work, and accelerating its impact. Continue reading “Kudos launching new dissemination management and impact acceleration services”

How to launch a transformative and sustainable forum for publication and scholarly critiques of research in the life sciences?

By Harinder Singh Director, Division of Immunobiology and the Center for Systems Immunology Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center This perspective is a result of the various insightful commentaries that have been posted on the ASAPbio site in the context of the HHMI/Wellcome/ASAPbio meeting on “Transparency, Recognition and Innovation in Peer Review in the Life Sciences.” […]

Copyright and systematic reviews: do researchers have to break the rules to produce good quality research?

Jane Falconer is a medical librarian with over 20 years experience in medical charities, the NHS and Higher Education. She is currently the User Support Services Librarian at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, responsible for all user-facing library services, including user training and support, membership, access and enquiry support, reading lists, interlibrary loans and liaison services. She also provides literature searching support for systematic reviews, she has created and run the searches on a number of projects including the Lancet Commission on Planetary Health and the WHO Guidelines on Heptatitis B and C Testing. ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7329-0577. Jane got in touch via Twitter as she was frustrated by copyright laws that prevented her sharing medical articles with researchers around the world. Here’s what she told us…..

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Community-driven open source: evolving software development

I’m showing my age here, but having observed the evolution of web development since it’s early days, it’s fascinating to look at how it’s become increasingly open to contributions from an ever-increasing set of participants. From the mid-90s when internet technologies were literally built in isolation in a garage through to the birth of user-centered design and agile, there has been steady growth in the attempts to bring the voices of those who will actually use the technology into the process.

Continue reading “Community-driven open source: evolving software development”

Transformation Takes More Than Ideas

Stories of innovation usually follow a simple, but common narrative. Someone gets an idea, figures out how to make it work and changes the world. Yet that is rarely how it actually happens. Far more often, someone comes up with a great idea and it never gets off the ground because no one is willing to accept it. Continue reading “Transformation Takes More Than Ideas”

Open science: University of Toronto researchers to publish lab notes in real time

About 20 scientists affiliated with a University of Toronto research organization have agreed to publish their lab notes in real time, a groundbreaking move aimed at hastening the discovery of new medical treatments.

The researchers, who work on some of the most untreatable diseases, such as ALS and rare children’s brain tumors, are part of the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), which has laboratories  at U of T and McGill University in Canada, and laboratories in Europe, the U.S. and South America.

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What we read this week (9 Feb 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. Check back every Friday for a new post.

Voice UI

Voice UI is definitely coming but the big question is what will researchers use it for? We have plenty of anecdotal evidence that users are listening to academic articles via a range of apps and browser functionality . BMJ is experimenting with voice driven interactions but even simple things like indexing the BMJ in TuneIn to allow users to ask Alexa to play them has proved tricky. “Alexa play Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery podcast” usually works but “Alexa play Heart podcast” isn’t going to bring up the Heart Journal podcast – especially near Valentine’s Day! Continue reading “What we read this week (9 Feb 2018)”

The NYT is boarding the AR train — here’s what that means for storytelling


The New York Times has just announced it would begin incorporating augmented reality in its journalism. The Times prominently featured the announcement on its website’s front page, speaking to the publisher’s commitment to offer its readers and subscribers the highest quality news content by investing in new digital content technologies. Continue reading “The NYT is boarding the AR train — here’s what that means for storytelling”

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