Understanding the implications of Open Citations — how far along are we?

Understanding the implications of Open Citations — how far along are we?

The academic discovery space seems to be buzzing again. This space has become relatively stable after the introduction and maturity of Web Scale Discovery between 2009–2013, but things seem to be hotting up once again. Continue reading “Understanding the implications of Open Citations — how far along are we?”

Digiday Research: Voice is a low priority for marketers

At the Digiday AI Marketing Summit this month in Santa Barbara, California, we spoke with leaders from 37 companies interested in applying artificial intelligence to marketing and learned about their plans for voice marketing. Check out our earlier research on AI’s potential to replace media buyers here. Learn more about our upcoming events here. Continue reading “Digiday Research: Voice is a low priority for marketers”

What we read this week (27 April 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. It’s an eclectic mix this week:

Publishing:

We’re really interested to see how the FT’s experiment with :CRUX to use Knowledge Acquisition as an approach to content recommendation will work out. We could see this approach working well for some of our audience segments.

Continue reading “What we read this week (27 April 2018)”

Agile (Not Just for Tech…)

Recently I’ve been thinking about Agile… and not just in relation to technology but in relation to all business processes in publishing and elsewhere.

Organisations have started using Agile approaches to manage complex projects outside technology, sometimes combined with Six Sigma or Kanban, sometimes not. But what about the core of what we do, publishing itself!

Read full blog post on Well Thought Through

‘A massive scramble’: Candid thoughts of marketers on GDPR fallout

Data privacy and getting compliant in time for the General Data Protection Regulation was a hotly debated topic for marketers attending the Digiday Programmatic Marketing Summit Europe in Estoril, Portugal, this week.

With less than a month to go until the deadline for GDPR enforcement, uncertainty around who in the supply chain will be held responsible should regulators decide to prosecute remains top of mind. We’ve collected some of the main concerns that attendees talked about throughout the week — under condition of anonymity — to give a flavor of what execs across the digital ad industry are truly thinking. Continue reading “‘A massive scramble’: Candid thoughts of marketers on GDPR fallout”

How Important is Data Curation? Gaps and Opportunities for Academic Libraries

INTRODUCTION Data curation may be an emerging service for academic libraries, but researchers actively “curate” their data in a number of ways—even if terminology may not always align. Building on past userneeds assessments performed via survey and focus groups, the authors sought direct input from researchers on the importance and utilization of specific data curation activities. METHODS Between October 21, 2016, and November 18, 2016, the study team held focus groups with 91 participants at six different academic institutions to determine which data curation activities were most important to researchers, which activities were currently underway for their data, and how satisfied they were with the results. RESULTS Researchers are actively engaged in a variety of data curation activities, and while they considered most data curation activities to be highly important, a majority of the sample reported dissatisfaction with the current state of data curation at their institution. DISCUSSION Our findings demonstrate specific gaps and opportunities for academic libraries to focus their data curation services to more effectively meet researcher needs. CONCLUSION Research libraries stand to benefit their users by emphasizing, investing in, and/or heavily promoting the highly valued services that may not currently be in use by many researchers. Published on 2018-04-26 21:11:38

A new series from The BMJ highlights unreported trials

The BMJ highlights unreported clinical trialsThe FDA Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA) and the “Final Rule” define the global ethical obligation to report the results of all clinical trials within a reasonable timeframe. However, the lack of reporting of clinical trials is still a prominent issue, with potential implications for treatment decisions and patient care. Last month, The BMJ unveiled a new, regular feature that intends to publicise unreported trials to encourage their reporting. Brief summaries in this series, published once per week, will highlight individual, unreported trials, the results of which may have important clinical relevance.

‘Unreported trials of the week’ will be selected using TrialsTracker. Launched by the AllTrials campaign, this FDAAA compliance tracking tool tracks trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov and those that breach the FDAAA. At the time of writing, this tool identified 35% of trials as having unreported results.

The weekly series has already gone live; the first feature described an unreported study on analgesics for postoperative pain following the extraction of wisdom teeth. The feature’s authors, Nicholas J DeVito and Ben Goldacre, hope that the series will spark productive discussions focussed on improving reporting rates.

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Summary by Emma Prest PhD from Aspire Scientific


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The post A new series from The BMJ highlights unreported trials appeared first on The Publication Plan for everyone interested in medical writing, the development of medical publications, and publication planning.

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