Tweetstorms are better with friends: How three papers are tweeting together over 4-plus days

Tweetstorms are usually the work of one person, but what if you could bring other voices in too? That’s what The Washington Post, Baltimore Sun, and Chicago Tribune did this week: They worked together to tweet about the riots that followed Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination in 1968.

The threaded tweets linked back to the papers’ own coverage of the 50th anniversary of the assassination and how it affected their respective cities. Here’s the Post’s coverage, here’s the Sun’s, and here’s the Tribune’s.

The thread was the original idea of Tauhid Chappell, who until recently was an embedded audience editor on The Washington Post’s local desk (he’ll soon start a position as the engagement editor at the Philly Inquirer). The project was run by the Post’s Julie Vitkovskaya, digital operations/projects director, and Ric Sanchez, social media editor; the Tribune’s digital news editor Elizabeth Wolfe, and the Sun’s audience editor Steve Earley. In a shared Google doc, they planned out tweets, including the timestamps for roughly when each would go out. The first tweet was sent at 7:01 p.m. ET on April 4, almost exactly 50 years since King was pronounced dead and the riots began. The papers will continue to tweet for as long as the riots lasted in their cities: The Post will stop adding to the thread on April 7, the Tribune will add to it through April 8, and the Sun will add to the thread through April 14, when the Baltimore riots ended.

Vitkovskaya has been thinking about how a group tweet thread would work within the Post — for example, the Post’s main account could start tweeting about a story like the violence in Gaza, and then the Post’s Jerusalem bureau chief, Loveday Morris, could continue tweeting and reporting from Gaza itself over a period of several days. “We see this as a tool we’d like to use again,” she said.

Lessons Learned from the Quartz Email Team

An interview with Eva ScazzeroJessanne Collins, and Adam Pasick of Quartz.

Including an awesome range of elements (animated GIFs, infographics, videos, and embedded surveys and quizzes), Quartz delivers some of the most engaging and interactive newsletters we’ve ever seen. Design-wise, they’re clean and consistent. Content-wise, they’re smart, relevant, and well-written. And the topics of their Obsession emails are random and nerdy enough to give you a killer edge at trivia night.

Gamifying their newsletter has yielded tremendous results: growing to 700,000 subscribers, they doubled the size of their subscriber base in 2017. ….

Read full post

Publishers warm to Google, but still worry about getting crowded out in search results

Google has done several things to make publishers smile lately: From its work on fast-loading mobile pages to ending first-click-free to promoting subscription sales, Google has positioned itself favorably with publishers, especially as Facebook’s relationship with publishers has become increasingly strained. Continue reading “Publishers warm to Google, but still worry about getting crowded out in search results”

He Predicted The 2016 Fake News Crisis. Now He’s Worried About An Information Apocalypse.

In mid-2016Aviv Ovadya realized there was something fundamentally wrong with the internet — so wrong that he abandoned his work and sounded an alarm. A few weeks before the 2016 election, he presented his concerns to technologists in San Francisco’s Bay Area and warned of an impending crisis of misinformation in a presentation he titled “Infocalypse.”

“What happens when anyone can make it appear as if anything has happened, regardless of whether or not it did?” technologist Aviv Ovadya warns.

Read full story

Getting Linked In to Data Science with Dr. Igor Perisic

Dr. Igor Perisic – Chief Data Officer

Episode 11, February 7, 2018

Getting Linked In to Data Science with Dr. Igor Perisic

Big data is a big deal, and if you follow the popular technical press, you’ll have heard all the metaphors: data is the new oil, the new bacon, the new currency, the new electricity. It’s even been called the new black. While data may not actually be any of these things, we can say this: in today’s networked world, data is increasingly valuable, and it is essential to research, both basic and applied. Continue reading “Getting Linked In to Data Science with Dr. Igor Perisic”

The new podcast is here, and just in time for your commute. Don’t miss a chance to hear from Ruth Pickering about how @DoYewno is helping others uncover the undiscovered faster with AI and neural networking. https://blog.outsellinc.com/uncovering-the-undiscovered-faster-with-ai-and-neural-networking-e02eb28dc1b3 …

The new podcast is here, and just in time for your commute. Don’t miss a chance to hear from Ruth Pickering about how is helping others uncover the undiscovered faster with AI and neural networking. https://blog.outsellinc.com/uncovering-the-undiscovered-faster-with-ai-and-neural-networking-e02eb28dc1b3 …

Meeting report: summary of day 1 of the 2018 European ISMPP Meeting

The 2018 European Meeting of the International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) was held in London on 23–24 January and attracted nearly 300 delegates; the highest number of attendees to date. The meeting’s theme was ‘Advancing Medical Publications in a Complex Evidence Ecosystem’ and the agenda centred around data transparency, patient centricity and the future of medical publishing. Delegates were treated to two keynote addresses, lively panel discussions, interactive roundtables and parallel sessions, and also had the chance to present their own research in a poster session. Continue reading “Meeting report: summary of day 1 of the 2018 European ISMPP Meeting”

More than half of Facebook Instant Articles partners may have abandoned it

More than half of Facebook’s launch partners on Instant Articles appear to have abandoned the format, new Tow Center research suggests. Of 72 publishers that Facebook identified as original partners in May and October 2015, our analysis of 2,308 links posted to their Facebook pages on January 17, 2018, finds that 38 publications did not […]

Read full post

Above: Declining use of Instant Articles by The New York Times, Vox, and The Washington Post, April 2016–November 2017.

With ePrivacy looming, German publishers scramble to get users logged in

The looming ePrivacy Regulation is creating a new battleground in Europe: the race to own consumer login systems, for better or worse.

When and how publishers arrive there depends on their business models and markets. But in Germany, the login strategy is a tactic many are adopting to ensure their business’ sustainability, should they have to abide by the proposed ePrivacy law and gain consumer consent for all cookie use. Continue reading “With ePrivacy looming, German publishers scramble to get users logged in”

NIH’s Data Commons Pilot project seeks to break down barriers in biomedical research

“Ten years from now, I expect biomedical research will look much different than it does today. I expect researchers will be able to tap a wide range of data streams, which will not only be accessible, they will all be in a format that can be easily shared and reused. By building upon each other’s data, researchers will be able to collectively accelerate biomedical discovery.”

View full post

How The New York Times is using interactive tools to build loyalty (and ultimately subscriptions)

The New York Times’ lofty goal of getting to 10 million subscribers is an all-hands-on-deck mission — involving even its Interactive News desk, the group charged with creating graphs and other interactive elements that support the paper’s long articles. Continue reading “How The New York Times is using interactive tools to build loyalty (and ultimately subscriptions)”

Understanding the implications of Open Citations – how far along are we?

The academic discovery space seems to be buzzing again. This space has become relatively stable after the introduction and maturity of Web Scale Discovery between 2009-2013, but things seem to be hotting up once again.

With the recent interest in integrating discovery of open access, as well as linked data (with a dash of machine learning and text mining)  we have the beginnings of an interesting situation. A third development which was harder to forsee is the rise in Open Citation movement which I will focus on in this post. Continue reading “Understanding the implications of Open Citations – how far along are we?”

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑