Do preprints have a place in today’s reference lists?

Do preprints have a place in todays’ reference lists TransparencyThe use of preprints (a research paper made publicly available before publication in a peer reviewed journal) is on the rise in the biomedical field. In an article in The Scholarly Kitchen, David Crotty asks whether preprints should be cited in the same way as articles published in a peer reviewed journal. While discussing the pros and cons of using preprints, the author recognises the need for clear citation guidelines. He concludes that publishers will need to play an active role in establishing a broadly accepted standard to “preserve quality, transparency and trustworthiness of scholarly literature”. Continue reading “Do preprints have a place in today’s reference lists?”

Bronze beats gold in open access: implications for data re-use

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Support for the open access (OA) movement is increasing, yet the majority of OA articles do not have a license that permits free re-use of contents, and so do not fully comply with the 2002 Budapest OA Initiative (BOAI) definition of OA. In a recent study by Piwowar et al, representative samples were taken from the online databases Crossref, Web of Science and Unpaywall (100,000 articles from each) to determine the prevalence and type of OA publications. Importantly, this involved categorisation of articles as follows:

  • gold OA – published in an OA journal indexed by the Directory of OA Journals (DOAJ)
  • green OA – paid-for access via the publisher’s webpage but free access in an OA repository
  • hybrid OA – OA in a journal that also publishes non-OA articles
  • ‘bronze’ OA – free to read on the publisher’s webpage but without a license permitting free re-use of content
  • closed access – all other articles.

The most common form of OA was ‘bronze’. This may have implications for research; the lack of a license permitting the free re-use of an article’s contents can substantially restrict the impact of the data therein, for example by preventing other groups from conducting further analyses. In a recent Nature Index article, Piwowar notes that in the current age of machine learning and ‘big data’, it is especially important that data are freely available for computational analysis. Overall, the study found that 47% of articles were OA in 2015 (the most recent year of analysis), and the authors predict that all articles could be OA by 2040. Despite this encouraging forecast, the future of OA may be less bright if bronze OA continues to prevail.

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Summary by Emma Prest PhD from Aspire Scientific


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The post Bronze beats gold in open access: implications for data re-use appeared first on The Publication Plan for everyone interested in medical writing, the development of medical publications, and publication planning.

Interested in the Latest Trends in Medical Publications? Attend the 14th Annual Meeting of ISMPP!

 

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Themed From Publication to Practice: Advancing Science Through Effective Communication, this year’s Annual Meeting will feature enlightening sessions and peer-to-peer discussion of interest to both seasoned publication professionals and those who are newer to the profession Continue reading “Interested in the Latest Trends in Medical Publications? Attend the 14th Annual Meeting of ISMPP!”

Meeting report: summary of day 1 of the 2018 European ISMPP Meeting

The 2018 European Meeting of the International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) was held in London on 23–24 January and attracted nearly 300 delegates; the highest number of attendees to date. The meeting’s theme was ‘Advancing Medical Publications in a Complex Evidence Ecosystem’ and the agenda centred around data transparency, patient centricity and the future of medical publishing. Delegates were treated to two keynote addresses, lively panel discussions, interactive roundtables and parallel sessions, and also had the chance to present their own research in a poster session. Continue reading “Meeting report: summary of day 1 of the 2018 European ISMPP Meeting”

The future of open access: ideas for change

 

Existing open access (OA) models allow published research to be made readily available to all, with authors either covering the cost of publication in a journal (Gold OA) or self-archiving their papers in online repositories (Green OA). Both models have their drawbacks, for example Gold OA has inherent benefits for publishers and Green OA can be completed without peer review. In a recent opinion piece in EMBO Reports, Ignacio Amigo and Alberto Pascual-García propose a new publishing system that would remove these conflicts, allow key players within the system to make best use of their respective skills, and would ultimately separate economic interests from scientific research. Continue reading “The future of open access: ideas for change”

The ‘open access effect’: freely available academic books

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The benefits of publishing  research open access are numerous and well-known. Allowing a paper to be available to all can increase citation rates and drive public engagement. But is the same effect seen when the open access model is applied to academic books? Springer Nature has published over 400 freely available books on their SpringerLink platform. In a recent press release, the publisher announced results of a major comparative analysis which demonstrated that the ‘open access effect’ appears to be real for scholarly books as well. Continue reading “The ‘open access effect’: freely available academic books”

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