Amazon unveils DeepLens, a $249 camera for deep learning


Amazon Web Services today unveiled DeepLens, a wireless video camera made for the quick deployment of deep learning. The camera will cost $249 and is scheduled to ship for customers in the United States in April 2018.

DeepLens comes pre-loaded with AWS Greengrass for local computation and can operate with SageMaker, a new service to simplify the deployment of AI models, as well as popular open source AI services such as TensorFlow from Google and Caffe2 from Facebook, according to an AWS blog. Continue reading “Amazon unveils DeepLens, a $249 camera for deep learning”

FCC gutting net neutrality would reverse over a decade of work trying to protect internet users

In a new proposal issued last week, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) set out a plan to eliminate net neutrality protections, ignoring the voices of millions of Internet users who weighed in to support those protections. The new rule would reclassify high-speed broadband as an “information service” rather than a “telecommunications service” (remember, the FCC is forbidden from imposing neutrality obligations on information services). It would then eliminate the bright-line rules against blocking, throttling, and pay-to-play (as well as the more nebulous general conduct standard) in favor of a simplistic transparency requirement. In other words, your ISP would be free to set itself up as an Internet gatekeeper, as long as it is honest about it.

This is a bad idea for many, many reasons. Here are a few. Continue reading “FCC gutting net neutrality would reverse over a decade of work trying to protect internet users”

Nvidia and Nuance team up on AI for radiology


Nvidia and Nuance announced a partnership today that’s aimed at helping healthcare institutions tap into artificial intelligence. The Nuance AI Marketplace for Diagnostic Imaging is, as the name suggests, designed to provide a hub for medical professionals to pick up new tools for analyzing the results of x-ray imaging and other radiology tools.

AI developers will be able to release the models that they’ve trained through Nuance’s PowerShare network, which will then allow participating medical institutions and radiology groups to subscribe. After subscribing, Nuance’s PowerScribe software will automatically apply the AI algorithm in relevant situations.

Nvidia’s Digits developer tool will be updated to provide developers with a way to publish their algorithms directly to Nuance PowerShare, so it’s easier for people to get their applications into the marketplace.

The deal is designed to make it easier for medical institutions to benefit from the rise of machine learning by offering access to trained models. What’s more, the institutions developing these models can benefit from sharing them with other radiologists to drive the overall state of the field forward.

Medical imaging is a tough field to tackle with machine learning, since it encompasses multiple different sections of the body, along with different machines that output different results. (A static x-ray film is quite different than a video of an ultrasound, for example.) On top of that, radiologists are often looking for different objects on the resulting images or videos, depending on what they’re looking for.

With that in mind, Kimberly Powell, the vice president for healthcare at Nvidia, said that she expects multiple algorithms working in concert will be necessary to provide even a single diagnosis through a single test. The marketplace is supposed to support that vision by making it easier for medical professionals to orchestrate the use of multiple systems.

The news comes alongside another partnership between Nvidia and GE Healthcare to use the chipmaker’s hardware to help power improved hardware for CT scans and ultrasounds, as well as an analytics platform.

Google and Salesforce sign massive strategic partnership

Google and Salesforce announced a massive strategic partnership today that’s aimed at driving value across their mutual customers. As part of the deal, Salesforce plans to use Google Cloud Platform infrastructure as a preferred partner to power the tech titan’s international expansion. Google, for its part, will use Salesforce as its preferred CRM provider for selling its cloud services.

Continue reading “Google and Salesforce sign massive strategic partnership”

Google’s AI-powered video analyzer hits public beta


Google released its Cloud Video Intelligence API to the world today by making it available in public beta, as part of the company’s ongoing push to make AI accessible.

The Video Intelligence API is designed to let users upload a video and get information back about what objects are in it, using a system called label detection. With this release, the company also added support for detecting pornographic content, making it possible to use the service to spot videos that would be inappropriate to share with an audience that isn’t looking for that sort of content.

In addition, Google also announced a number of improvements to its Cloud Vision API to make various features more accurate. The label detection model, which names objects inside an image, now supports more than 10,000 different entities, so it can spot the difference between “breakfast cereal” and just “breakfast.” That model is also twice as good at recall, which means that it’s more likely to pick the most relevant label for an image.

The service’s safe search model, which detects adult content, saw a 30 percent reduction in errors. The Vision API’s text detection model saw a 25 percent increase in average speed of detection, and 5 percent increase in accuracy on latin languages. Google’s system is also better at reading human emotions: the face detection system is more than twice as good at recognizing sadness, surprise and anger than it was at launch.

Google’s services are designed to make it easier for people to implement AI capabilities inside their applications without building the machine learning systems needed to power them. Today’s news shows one of the key benefits of those systems: it’s possible to gain major improvements in applications that use them without doing anything, just because the company behind the system makes improvements in the background.

The Cloud Video Intelligence API launched in private beta earlier this year, as part of the announcements made at the Google Cloud Next conference.

Google is competing with a wide variety of companies in the intelligent API space, including titans like Microsoft, Amazon and IBM.

As part of the Video Intelligence API’s public beta launch, Google announced pricing for the service. Label and adult content detection is free for the first 1,000 minutes of video uploaded, and costs 10 cents per minute for the next 9,000 minutes. Shot detection, which finds scene changes within a video, is also free for the first 1,000 minutes, and then costs 5 cents per minute for the next 9,000 minutes.

Companies that need additional time should contact Google for additional pricing information.

Google opens digital skills academy in London to ‘educate and inspire’


Google has opened the doors to a new digital academy in the heart of London, designed as a hub for “educating and inspiring” everyone from schoolkids to company founders.

The new digital space, which Google calls The Academy, will be home to “Googlers and external industry experts” who will be on hand to support a range of “educational and inspirational experiences,” including meetings, collaborative events, and workshops. The venue is kitted out with themed spaces including the Electric Cinema, Beach, and Funfair auditoriums.

Above: Google Academy: Electric Cinema

Above: Google Academy: Beach

“The Academy has been created to educate and inspire everyone from schoolchildren to CEOs as part of Google’s plans to help build digital capability across the country,” said Google’s U.K. managing director Ronan Harris.

The 40,000-square foot venue was opened to mark the annual London Tech Week event, the first since the U.K. voted to leave the European Union (EU) last June. Indeed, the city’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, opened the 2017 event by saying that Brexit won’t curtail London’s technology sector — despite many signals to the contrary.

“London’s ambition to grow, harness new technologies, and build the brightest and best companies has been a constant over the last decade,” added Harris. “When the tech community with industries ranging from fashion and music to automotives and AI have worked in partnership with government, the mayor’s office, and passionate communities supporting startups and scaleups, new jobs have been created and London has shown it can lead the way in a competitive global environment.”

Today’s announcement comes just a couple of weeks after Google submitted plans for its gargantuan new 92,000-square metre “landscraper” London HQ, with construction anticipated for a 2018 start with an expected two-year build.

 

Everything Microsoft announced at Build 2017


So Microsoft’s annual Build developer conference came and went, and the computing giant unveiled a number of initiatives aimed at the software engineers and web developers of the world.

From Windows 10 to Cortana and bots, here’s a quick recap of everything announced at Build 2017.

Embracing the competition

A core theme to emerge from Build 2017 was Microsoft’s tacit acknowledgement that it needs to embrace competing platforms if it’s to thrive as a software and services company.

Though iTunes has been available on Windows for more than a decade, Microsoft revealed that Apple’s media-focused software would be landing in the Windows Store later this year, a key launch given the impending arrival of Windows 10 S which can only use apps available in the Windows Store.

Elsewhere, Microsoft also announced that its cloud storage service, OneDrive, would soon work with Apple’s iMessage, letting users share documents and photos with friends without leaving their iMessage chat. As part of the same announcement, Microsoft revealed that it was opening offline access to folders within OneDrive on Android, with support for iOS users coming later this year.

Microsoft also unveiled Xamarin Live Player in preview, which is effectively a “live coding environment” for developers to debug Android and iOS apps without SDKs or emulators.

Additionally, Microsoft’s integrated development environment (IDE), Visual Studio, was also launched out of preview for Mac. And as another swift reminder that Microsoft has been increasingly prioritizing the “big 2” mobile operating systems over its own, the company finally revealed that Visual Studio Mobile Center was finally getting Windows support — seven months after debuting with support only for Android and iOS.

In a show of support for developers and fans of Linux, Microsoft also revealed that Ubuntu, Suse Linux, and Fedora are all coming to the Windows Store, making it easier to run Linux apps on Windows 10 devices.

Bots, Cortana, & AI

A little more than a year after launching its Bot Framework, Microsoft revealed that it’s now used by over 130,000 developers. With that in mind, the company used Build 2017 to announce that Bing search results now include Skype bots, in addition to myriad chat apps including Slack, Facebook Messenger, and Telegram. Bots will also soon be able to join video conversations in Skype, with developers able to use the BotBuilder RealTimeMediaCalling extension on Github, which just entered preview.

Microsoft also revealed that Cognitive Services, a conduit for third-parties to access its AI algorithms for “vision, speech, language, and knowledge,” was arriving on a bot-to-bot communication platform Interbot, a product from Gupshup. Related to this, Microsoft announced it was releasing four new customizable artificial intelligence services via Cognitive Services, allowing developers to build even more AI into their own products.

A number of announcements were also made relating to Cortana, Microsoft’s voice-enabled digital assistant. The company announced a public preview of its Cortana Skills Kit that enables developers to create voice apps for Cortana, and more than 20 such apps made their debut at Build. The software giant also revealed that it was working with both Intel and HP to bring more Cortana-powered devices to market.

Microsoft’s bread and butter

Microsoft announced some interesting tidbits about its core bread and butter services, in addition to making a few surprise announcements.

The company gave a glimpse into how it wants to tie its various apps, products, and platforms together with the Microsoft Fluent Design System, which is effectively guidelines to enable Microsoft to evolve its Metro/Modern UI design language, replete with rules for developers creating software to run on Windows 10.

Microsoft also demonstrated Windows 10 running on devices with ARM processors, with full support for existing Win32 apps. And it also revealed that Windows 10 is now installed on more than 500 million devices, a feat that took around 21 months to achieve.

Looking to the future, Microsoft announced a new Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, which is coming later this year, with the company teasing a new creative app called Windows Story Remix that uses the Microsoft Graph to transform and combine your photos and videos.

As part of the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, Microsoft also outlined plans to launch OneDrive files on-demand, a feature that lets users access their files online without having to download them and consume valuable storage space on their devices.

Elsewhere, Microsoft had a little news to share around its cloud computer service Azure. With Azure Cosmos DB, Microsoft is offering a globally distributed database with five consistency choices, rather than forcing developers to choose between strong and eventual consistency.

Other notable announcements to emerge from Build include: developers can now publish Microsoft Teams apps to the Office Store, while Microsoft unveiled its first Windows Mixed Reality motion controllers, alongside a mixed reality developer kit.

Finally, one of the more interesting early-stage products to emerge at Build was the Emma Watch, a wearable that counters Parkinson’s tremors through using vibrations.

Read GamesBeat Summit Stories Here

Digital Science Webinar: Science in the Cloud

Join Amazon Web Services, Digital Science and Figshare for our next thought leadership webinar ‘Science in the Cloud’, on May 25th at 4pm BST / 11am ET.

You’ll hear about the trends in cloud-based computing and the importance of failure in innovation and how this can lead to great science. Discussions will also look at the benefits of investing in cloud-based applications and infrastructure.

REGISTER NOW

Thought leaders speaking:

Brendan Bouffler (“boof”) – Global Manager, Amazon Web Services Research Cloud Program

Based in London, Brendan Bouffler has 25 years of experience in the global tech industry creating very large systems in high-performance environments. He has been responsible for designing and building hundreds of HPC systems for commercial enterprises as well as research and defense sectors all around the world and has quite a number of his efforts listed in the top500, including some that have placed in the top 5.

Brendan previously led the HPC Organization in Asia for a hardware maker but joined Amazon in 2014 to accelerate the adoption of cloud computing in the scientific community globally, and is the author of the Research’s Handbook – the missing manual for research in AWS. He holds a degree in Physics and an interest in testing several of its laws as they apply to bicycles. This has frequently resulted in hospitalization.

Dan Valen – Product Manager, Figshare

dan vDan is an expert in everything STM publishing and brings a wealth of experience to Figshare. Dan’s love of technology, innovation and fixing the broken meant a career in science was his destiny.

 

Steve Scott – Director of Portfolio Development, Digital Science

Steve Scott As a member of the founding management team of Digital Science, Steve has been involved in the majority of Digital Science’s portfolio investments, taking founders through product and business model validation to launch and growth.

An entrepreneur himself, Steve has founded, or been involved in setting up, three of his own companies. He also oversees the Catalyst Grant award, a twice-yearly award of up to £25k ($30k USD) to early stage ideas.

Host: Laura Wheeler – Head of Digital Communications, Digital Science

Laura is in charge of growing the presence of Digital Science and is always busy helping to build online communities. Having studied Biochemistry Laura left the lab life for science communication roles at the BBC and at Nature Publishing Group.

REGISTER NOW

The post Digital Science Webinar: Science in the Cloud appeared first on Digital Science.

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑