Twitter will crack down on automation and simultaneous actions across multiple accounts

(Reuters) — Twitter said on Wednesday it would no longer allow people to post identical messages from multiple accounts, cracking down on a tactic that Russian agents and others have allegedly used to make tweets or topics go viral.

The San Francisco-based social network also said it would not allow people to use software to simultaneously perform other actions such as liking or retweeting from multiple accounts. Continue reading “Twitter will crack down on automation and simultaneous actions across multiple accounts”

Google details how Chrome will block ads


As planned, Google Chrome will start blocking ads on February 15. The company today shared more details on how this feature will work when it’s turned on tomorrow.

Google last year joined the Coalition for Better Ads, a group that offers specific standards for how the industry should improve ads for consumers. The company then revealed that Chrome will stop showing all ads (including those owned or served by Google) on websites that display non-compliant ads, as defined by the coalition. Continue reading “Google details how Chrome will block ads”

Google Search will start ranking faster mobile pages higher in July

Google today announced a new project to improve its mobile search results: factoring page speed into its search ranking. As the company notes, page speed “has been used in ranking for some time” but that was largely for desktop searches. Starting in July 2018, page speed will be a ranking factor for mobile searches on Google as well. Continue reading “Google Search will start ranking faster mobile pages higher in July”

Chrome for Windows will start blocking third-party software injections in 2018


Next year is going to be big for Chrome, if you believe everything Google has announced so far: going to war against low-quality ads, autoplaying content with sound, and unwanted redirects. The company today added a smaller, but still significant, initiative to its to-do list: reducing Chrome crashes caused by third-party software on Windows.

Continue reading “Chrome for Windows will start blocking third-party software injections in 2018”

Amazon unveils DeepLens, a $249 camera for deep learning


Amazon Web Services today unveiled DeepLens, a wireless video camera made for the quick deployment of deep learning. The camera will cost $249 and is scheduled to ship for customers in the United States in April 2018.

DeepLens comes pre-loaded with AWS Greengrass for local computation and can operate with SageMaker, a new service to simplify the deployment of AI models, as well as popular open source AI services such as TensorFlow from Google and Caffe2 from Facebook, according to an AWS blog. Continue reading “Amazon unveils DeepLens, a $249 camera for deep learning”

FCC gutting net neutrality would reverse over a decade of work trying to protect internet users

In a new proposal issued last week, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) set out a plan to eliminate net neutrality protections, ignoring the voices of millions of Internet users who weighed in to support those protections. The new rule would reclassify high-speed broadband as an “information service” rather than a “telecommunications service” (remember, the FCC is forbidden from imposing neutrality obligations on information services). It would then eliminate the bright-line rules against blocking, throttling, and pay-to-play (as well as the more nebulous general conduct standard) in favor of a simplistic transparency requirement. In other words, your ISP would be free to set itself up as an Internet gatekeeper, as long as it is honest about it.

This is a bad idea for many, many reasons. Here are a few. Continue reading “FCC gutting net neutrality would reverse over a decade of work trying to protect internet users”

Nvidia and Nuance team up on AI for radiology


Nvidia and Nuance announced a partnership today that’s aimed at helping healthcare institutions tap into artificial intelligence. The Nuance AI Marketplace for Diagnostic Imaging is, as the name suggests, designed to provide a hub for medical professionals to pick up new tools for analyzing the results of x-ray imaging and other radiology tools.

AI developers will be able to release the models that they’ve trained through Nuance’s PowerShare network, which will then allow participating medical institutions and radiology groups to subscribe. After subscribing, Nuance’s PowerScribe software will automatically apply the AI algorithm in relevant situations.

Nvidia’s Digits developer tool will be updated to provide developers with a way to publish their algorithms directly to Nuance PowerShare, so it’s easier for people to get their applications into the marketplace.

The deal is designed to make it easier for medical institutions to benefit from the rise of machine learning by offering access to trained models. What’s more, the institutions developing these models can benefit from sharing them with other radiologists to drive the overall state of the field forward.

Medical imaging is a tough field to tackle with machine learning, since it encompasses multiple different sections of the body, along with different machines that output different results. (A static x-ray film is quite different than a video of an ultrasound, for example.) On top of that, radiologists are often looking for different objects on the resulting images or videos, depending on what they’re looking for.

With that in mind, Kimberly Powell, the vice president for healthcare at Nvidia, said that she expects multiple algorithms working in concert will be necessary to provide even a single diagnosis through a single test. The marketplace is supposed to support that vision by making it easier for medical professionals to orchestrate the use of multiple systems.

The news comes alongside another partnership between Nvidia and GE Healthcare to use the chipmaker’s hardware to help power improved hardware for CT scans and ultrasounds, as well as an analytics platform.

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