Digiday Research: Where publishers get their video revenues

At the Digiday Video Summit last month in Scottsdale, Arizona, we sat down with 51 publisher executives to learn about social platforms’ contributions to their video revenues. Check out our research on publishers’ growing concerns about their ability to monetize content for over-the-top services here. Learn more about our upcoming events here. Continue reading “Digiday Research: Where publishers get their video revenues”

How Viacom uses artificial intelligence to predict the success of its social campaigns

To eliminate some of the guesswork from its social media campaigns, Viacom has turned to machines.

Over the past year, a seven-person data science team in Viacom’s ad sales group has been building a pipeline to collect near-real time information about how its social media posts perform. This way, the entertainment giant can predict how many social posts it will need to reach audience goals and what kinds of posts to use in each campaign. Continue reading “How Viacom uses artificial intelligence to predict the success of its social campaigns”

Subscription publishers (still) have platform problems

Platforms played integral roles in helping publishers scale audiences. Now, they’re helping with publishers’ subscription ambitions, with new product features and programs to educate publishers just starting to pursue consumer revenue.

While publishers are heartened by these steps, many are wary. Not only do platforms have a history of changing their minds about how their products work, they are also limited in their ability to help publishers’ subscription efforts. Here is a rundown of what the platforms have done and the gripes that publishers still have with them. Continue reading “Subscription publishers (still) have platform problems”

How The Economist’s new app tries to keep people from unsubscribing

To grow reader revenue, publishers are increasingly putting customers at the center of their organizations to drive subscriptions and retention.

For the past eight months, The Economist has worked to drive retention, as it’s cheaper to keep readers than to acquire new ones. Case in point is its new Economist app, which went live May 2 and is free to download, but requires a subscription to access articles. Continue reading “How The Economist’s new app tries to keep people from unsubscribing”

Digiday Research: Voice is a low priority for marketers

At the Digiday AI Marketing Summit this month in Santa Barbara, California, we spoke with leaders from 37 companies interested in applying artificial intelligence to marketing and learned about their plans for voice marketing. Check out our earlier research on AI’s potential to replace media buyers here. Learn more about our upcoming events here. Continue reading “Digiday Research: Voice is a low priority for marketers”

‘A massive scramble’: Candid thoughts of marketers on GDPR fallout

Data privacy and getting compliant in time for the General Data Protection Regulation was a hotly debated topic for marketers attending the Digiday Programmatic Marketing Summit Europe in Estoril, Portugal, this week.

With less than a month to go until the deadline for GDPR enforcement, uncertainty around who in the supply chain will be held responsible should regulators decide to prosecute remains top of mind. We’ve collected some of the main concerns that attendees talked about throughout the week — under condition of anonymity — to give a flavor of what execs across the digital ad industry are truly thinking. Continue reading “‘A massive scramble’: Candid thoughts of marketers on GDPR fallout”

Analyzing attribution: Effectively measuring marketing in the digital world

by Toby McKenna, executive vice president of global advertising at Bazaarvoice

Today’s marketers have access to an unprecedented amount of technologies, tools and data, giving them the ability to execute increasingly sophisticated campaigns, better report the ROI of their efforts and inform future marketing plans. However, with an abundance of data, platforms and channels being used, it’s hard to isolate the best marketing metrics and attribution models to prioritize. Business leaders are demanding more of their marketing teams, challenging them with proving the ROI of their digital campaigns and linking metrics back to meaningful business results. Continue reading “Analyzing attribution: Effectively measuring marketing in the digital world”

‘We want publishers to think the unthinkable’: How Axel Springer is reducing its reliance on Google ad tech

Axel Springer is on a mission to cut down on its dependence on Google ad tech — and it’s making progress.

In January, the German digital media giant, owner of Business Insider, Bild and other titles, completed the shift from its former waterfall-based ad tech stack used with Google in favor of using AppNexus as its ad server, into which it can plug in a variety of demand partners (including Google). It’s a strategy it began last spring. The result: Programmatic revenues rose 10 percent compared to the same period last year, while eCPMs jumped 28 percent. The publisher won’t disclose what percentage of its digital ad revenue comes from programmatically bought ads. Continue reading “‘We want publishers to think the unthinkable’: How Axel Springer is reducing its reliance on Google ad tech”

Overheard at Advertising Week Europe: Platforms must deliver value instead of ‘just stealing stuff from us’

As another Advertising Week Europe ends, marketers, publishers and agencies are rethinking their relationships with the duopoly, with Google’s grip on the ad market loosening and the fallout from the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal. Conference attendees stressed that the best relationships in marketing will be transparent and honest.

Here’s what was on executives’ minds at the conference: Continue reading “Overheard at Advertising Week Europe: Platforms must deliver value instead of ‘just stealing stuff from us’”

On the hunt for direct connections, publishers turn to registration walls

Consumer revenue is top of mind for many publishers, so some of them are starting with registration requirements.

Since October, Bloomberg Media has been requiring people that visit its site more than eight times per month to register. El Nuevo Día, a Spanish-language newspaper in Puerto Rico, now forces readers to submit an email address after reading 11 stories in a month, and has been testing registration walls with different messages and offers in an attempt to get them to hand over their emails. Continue reading “On the hunt for direct connections, publishers turn to registration walls”

French media is in talks about collaborating on a unified login system

Concerns about the looming ePrivacy Regulation, not to mention fear of the duopoly, are prompting European publishers to collaborate on joint consumer login systems. So far, Germany and Portugal have led the charge. Now, it looks like France could join the fray.

Leading national newspapers Le Monde, Le Figaro and Le Parisien are among the publishers discussing the potential for implementing a common single login across their sites, through which users can be automatically authenticated each time they visit one of the publishers’ sites. Continue reading “French media is in talks about collaborating on a unified login system”

How GDPR could weaken, not strengthen, the duopoly

Consensus on whether Google and Facebook stand to win or lose as a result of Europe’s new data-privacy laws seems to be changing.

Popular opinion has been that the direct relationship Facebook and Google have with consumers will make it easy for them to obtain consent, and as such they will ultimately be at an advantage. But as the deadline for the General Data Protection Regulation‘s enforcement edges closer and the ePrivacy Regulation continues to loom, a different line of thinking is emerging: that Google and Facebook are also in for a thrashing, in the short term at least. Continue reading “How GDPR could weaken, not strengthen, the duopoly”

The Rundown: Google distances itself from ‘platforms’

In this week’s Rundown: Google distances itself from “platforms,” Snapchat and Twitter woo publishers and Amazon lags in India.

What’s in a name?
As Facebook gets blamed for everything from polarizing America to helping Donald Trump’s election, it’s no accident that Google is distancing itself from the social network. One way is how it’s referred to. Recently, Google execs have insisted to anyone who will listen that Google is not to be called a platform. They’d rather it be a “technology company” or “just Google.” There’s a fair point there that key differences exist among the big tech platforms; Facebook is a walled garden and built around social interactions, while Google is about indexing the world’s information. Both make their money from advertising. But the subtext is that Facebook is taking a beating from just about everyone right now, and Google wants to be seen as one of the good guys. Just don’t call it a media company. — Lucia Moses

This article is behind the Digiday+ paywall.

The post The Rundown: Google distances itself from ‘platforms’ appeared first on Digiday.

Publishers warm to Google, but still worry about getting crowded out in search results

Google has done several things to make publishers smile lately: From its work on fast-loading mobile pages to ending first-click-free to promoting subscription sales, Google has positioned itself favorably with publishers, especially as Facebook’s relationship with publishers has become increasingly strained. Continue reading “Publishers warm to Google, but still worry about getting crowded out in search results”

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