Quickly flip through papers on your phone

Today, we are making it easier to use your phone to find and scan scholarly articles. Clicking a Scholar search result on your phone now opens a quick preview:

You can swipe left and right to quickly flip through the list of results. Where available, you can read abstracts. Or explore related and citing articles, which appear at the bottom of the preview along with other familiar Scholar features.

When you find an interesting article, you can click through to read it immediately, or you can tap the star icon to save it for later in your Scholar library. You’ll need to sign in to the same Google account on both the phone and the laptop to use this feature. This lets you find and save papers on your phone wherever you are. Once you get home, you can grab a cup of coffee and click “My library” on your laptop to get to your reading list.

Quick previews are available in Chrome, Safari, Samsung, and other standard browsers on recent Android and Apple phones. Sorry, they won’t work in Opera Mini or other special-purpose browsers; and they are not, at this time, available on tablets.

We would like to thank our partners in scholarly publishing that have worked with us on this. Working together, we hope to help make research more efficient everywhere.

Posted by: Alex Verstak, Software Engineer

Continue reading “Quickly flip through papers on your phone”

It’s Gonna Get a Lot Easier to Break Science Journal Paywalls

ANURAG ACHARYA’S PROBLEM was that the Google search bar is very smart, but also kind of dumb. As a Googler working on search 13 years ago, Acharya wanted to make search results encompass scholarly journal articles. A laudable goal, because unlike the open web, most of the raw output of scientific research was invisible—hidden behind paywalls. People might not even know it existed. “I grew up in India, and most of the time you didn’t even know if something existed. If you knew it existed, you could try to get it,” Acharya says. “‘How do I get access?’ is a second problem. If I don’t know about it, I won’t even try.”

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5 free ways around the great paywall of academia. #Updated December 2017#

“If you do not have subscription access to academic journals through an institution then to access a large proportion of academic journals you will be charged a fee for each paper; fees of $30 or more per article are common. And if you need to access a lot of papers then the cost quickly adds up. Needless to  say many people don’t have the means to pay. Of course you could stick to open access journals i.e. free to read and download (Head to the directory of Open Access Journals for easy access to a whole range of open access journals), but by doing so you will miss a lot of what’s happening in the academic world*. If you can’t afford to pay then you have a few options to get around the paywalls.”

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Understanding Federated identity, RA21 and other authentication methods

Debates on privacy in libraries are not new though they have recently become more heated over two issues. One issue resolves around learning analytics and this has been brewing for a while. The argument began in a different form with correlations of student success studies (which can be seen to be doing in a adhoc and limited manner what learning analytics aims to do).  While there has been talk of libraries particulating in learning analyticsthis particular Educause talk seems to have triggered librarians. Continue reading “Understanding Federated identity, RA21 and other authentication methods”

Where are the rising stars of research working? Towards a momentum-based look at research excellence

Traditional university rankings and leaderboards are largely an indicator of past performance of academic staff, some of whom conducted the research for which they are most famous elsewhere. Paul X. McCarthy has analysed bibliometric data to see which research institutions are accelerating fastest in terms of output and impact. The same data also offers a glimpse into the future, helping […]

4 New things about Google Scholar – UI, recommendations, and citation networks

I’m actually a pretty big fan of Google Scholar, which in some ways is better than our library discovery service ,but even if you aren’t a fan, given it’s popularity it’s important for librarians to keep up with the latest developments.

In any case, I’m happy to see that Google continues to enhance Google Scholar with new features. These are some of the new features and things I’ve learnt about Google Scholar lately. Continue reading “4 New things about Google Scholar – UI, recommendations, and citation networks”

Are search results in library discovery really more trust-worthy? Of Predatory journals & Authority

We can all agree that Google Scholar has many strengths , but no matter how complete or deep it’s indexing, how much better it is at finding free articles or it’s presumed better relevancy ranking , we librarians have always had one weakness of Google Scholar to point at. We often say “Despite it’s strengths, still we have to be careful, after all we don’t know what Google Scholar actually includes, as they refuse to provide lists of sources”. Continue reading “Are search results in library discovery really more trust-worthy? Of Predatory journals & Authority”

2017 Scholar Metrics Released

Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2017 version of Scholar Metrics. This release covers articles published in 2012–2016 and includes citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of June 2017.

Scholar Metrics include journal articles from websites that follow our inclusion guidelines, selected conference articles in Computer Science & Electrical Engineering and preprints from arXiv and NBER. Publications with fewer than 100 articles in 2012-2016, or publications that received no citations over these years are not included.

You can browse publications in specific categories such as Ceramic Engineering, High Energy & Nuclear Physics, or Film as well as broad areas like Engineering & Computer Science or Humanities, Literature & Arts . You will see the top 20 publications ordered by their five-year h-index and h-median metrics. You also can browse the top 100 publications in several languages – for example, Portuguese and Spanish. For each publication, you can view the top papers by clicking on the h5-index.

Scholar Metrics include a large number of publications beyond those listed on the per-category and per-language pages. You can find these by typing words from the title in the search box, e.g., [allergy], [cardiología], [biomarkers].

For more details, see the Scholar Metrics help page.

Posted by: Anurag Acharya, Distinguished Engineer

TrendMD provides higher reader engagement than Google Scholar or Twitter

TrendMD visitors are twice as engaged as readers from PubMed and Google Scholar, three times more engaged than Twitter referrals.

During September and October 2016, bounce rates for readers referred to the Journal of Medical Internet Research content via the TrendMD widget were half those of readers who used Google Scholar or PubMed, a third of bounce rates for readers directed from Twitter, and a quarter of those of readers who used Google.

But why do bounce rates matter? A high bounce rate means that readers aren’t exploring; readers are coming, looking at one page, and then leaving. High bounce rates mean low engagement.

Engagement with a site can be measured by bounce rate and pages viewed per session. Bounce rates refer to the proportion of visitors who only look at one page on a given site, while pages viewed per session refers to the number of pages a visitor will look at on average before navigating to a different site. In both respects, TrendMD sent significantly more engaged visitors to JMIR than Google Scholar, PubMed, Twitter, or Google.

How much more engaged are readers referred by TrendMD? In addition to much lower bounce rates (13% compared to 26% and above) readers directed to JMIR via TrendMD viewed 150% more pages per visit than any other source. This is 150% more content on a publisher’s site is discovered when the reader is referred by TrendMD.

Engaged readers mean more of your content is being discovered on every visit but also increases the probability of readers coming back and continuing to explore later. If you’re interested in finding out more about how TrendMD can increase your reader engagement, email us!

Organizing your Scholar library

Google Scholar Library allows you to build your personal collection of articles within Scholar. You can save articles right from the search page, organize them with labels, and use the power of Scholar’s full-text search & ranking to quickly find just the one you want. You decide what goes into your library and we provide all the goodies that come with Scholar search results – up to date article links, citing articles, related articles, formatted citations, links to your university’s subscriptions, and more.

As personal libraries have grown over time,  managing them takes more effort. Today we are making organizing your library easier by making it possible to update or export multiple articles with a single click. For example, if you are writing a new paper, you can quickly export the articles to cite to your favorite reference manager; if you are grouping papers that explore different aspects of your research area, you can select all papers in a sub-field and label them with one click.

If you don’t yet have a library,  it is easy to create one.

Posted by: Deepak Jindal, Senior Staff Engineer

2016 Scholar Metrics Released

Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2016 version of Scholar Metrics. This release covers articles published in 2011–2015 and includes citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of June 2016.

Scholar Metrics include journal articles from websites that follow our inclusion guidelines, selected conference articles in Computer Science & Electrical Engineering and preprints from arXiv and NBER. Publications with fewer than 100 articles in 2011-2015, or publications that received no citations over these years are not included.

You can browse publications in specific categories such as Food Science & Technology, Sustainable Energy, or Public Health as well as broad areas like Engineering & Computer Science or Humanities, Literature & Arts . You will see the top 20 publications ordered by their five-year h-index and h-median metrics. You also can browse the top 100 publications in several languages – for example, Portuguese and Spanish. For each publication, you can view the top papers by clicking on the h5-index.

Scholar Metrics include a large number of publications beyond those listed on the per-category and per-language pages. You can find these by typing words from the title in the search box, e.g., [journalism], [saúde], [genes].

In this release, we have added per-language pages for five new languages – Russian, Korean, Polish, Ukrainian, and Indonesian.

For more details, see the Scholar Metrics help page.

Posted by: Anurag Acharya, Distinguished Engineer

Query suggestions to help explore new topics

As a graduate student, I often had to find and read papers for my courses – usually in areas that I wasn’t familiar with. Google Scholar had already made it possible to find papers in all areas of research and the key challenge was to find the right keywords to search for. And then, when I joined the Scholar team, I had to quickly come up to speed with yet more research fields.

Today, we are launching query suggestions to help users explore topics they may not be familiar with. When you do a query, the results page may also include related search queries to help you  explore different directions within your topic of interest. Query suggestions appear after search results.

For example, see  [antiparkinson]. As Wikipedia mentions, antiparkinson medications are used to treat/relieve the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. The suggested queries span several directions:

Query suggestions span all broad areas of research. For example, see [gps antenna], [prions], [vaccination], [drug-eluting stents], [estoppel], [conformal field theory], [distributed database], [optimal stopping problem].

I wish I had access to something like this when I started working on query suggestions. Being able to quickly explore topics like [collocations], [language model] and [syntactic parsing] would have helped quite a bit…

As yet, query suggestions are available for selected English queries. We plan to expand the coverage to more languages and queries.

Posted by: Namit Shetty, Software Engineer

Quickly lookup references

As a graduate student and then a faculty member, I spent many a day trying to find references I had seen in articles. Tracking down each reference and then a copy of it that I was able to read often took several steps. With many a slip twixt the cup and the lip.

To help researchers quickly lookup references, Scholar now automatically identifies queries that are likely to be looking for a specific paper. For such queries, it tries hard to find the intended paper and a version that that particular user is able to read. You can lookup full references, e.g.:

King CY, Diaz-Avalos R (2004) Protein-only transmission of three yeast prion strains. Nature 428: 319–323.

Wong PC, Pardo CA, Borchelt DR, Lee MK, Copeland NG, Jenkins NA, Sisodia SS, Cleveland DW, Price DL (1995) An adverse property of a familial ALS-linked SOD1 mutation causes motor neuron disease characterized by vacuolar degeneration of mitochondria. Neuron 14:1105–1116.

Accetta, F. S., Zoller, D. J., & Turner, M. S. 1985, Phys. Rev., D31, 3046

Watanabe, Y., & Komatsu, E. 2006, Phys. Rev. D, 73, 123515

You can lookup article titles:

Emerald: A general‐purpose programming language

Compelling transgenetic evidence for transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions to humans

If all you remember is some of the authors and words from the title, that works in many cases too:

einstein rosen podolsky 1935

riedel gibson active disks

You can cut-and-paste references, type what you remember of the paper, or better still use the Scholar Button (available for Chrome, Firefox and Safari).

The astute reader has no doubt already figured out that this feature can be embedded on other web sites and can be used by libraries, publishers, teachers and others to help their own readers and students track down scholarly articles. To construct a Scholar lookup URL for an article title or a full reference, URL-escape the text and append it to https://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=. E.g., here is a link to one of our recent articles:

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=On+the+shoulders+of+giants%3A+The+growing+impact+of+older+articles.

We would like to thank Cliff Chiung Yu Lin for his contributions in making this feature possible.

Posted by: Anurag Acharya, Distinguished Engineer

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