On the hunt for direct connections, publishers turn to registration walls

Consumer revenue is top of mind for many publishers, so some of them are starting with registration requirements.

Since October, Bloomberg Media has been requiring people that visit its site more than eight times per month to register. El Nuevo Día, a Spanish-language newspaper in Puerto Rico, now forces readers to submit an email address after reading 11 stories in a month, and has been testing registration walls with different messages and offers in an attempt to get them to hand over their emails. Continue reading “On the hunt for direct connections, publishers turn to registration walls”

French media is in talks about collaborating on a unified login system

Concerns about the looming ePrivacy Regulation, not to mention fear of the duopoly, are prompting European publishers to collaborate on joint consumer login systems. So far, Germany and Portugal have led the charge. Now, it looks like France could join the fray.

Leading national newspapers Le Monde, Le Figaro and Le Parisien are among the publishers discussing the potential for implementing a common single login across their sites, through which users can be automatically authenticated each time they visit one of the publishers’ sites. Continue reading “French media is in talks about collaborating on a unified login system”

How GDPR could weaken, not strengthen, the duopoly

Consensus on whether Google and Facebook stand to win or lose as a result of Europe’s new data-privacy laws seems to be changing.

Popular opinion has been that the direct relationship Facebook and Google have with consumers will make it easy for them to obtain consent, and as such they will ultimately be at an advantage. But as the deadline for the General Data Protection Regulation‘s enforcement edges closer and the ePrivacy Regulation continues to loom, a different line of thinking is emerging: that Google and Facebook are also in for a thrashing, in the short term at least. Continue reading “How GDPR could weaken, not strengthen, the duopoly”

The Rundown: Google distances itself from ‘platforms’

In this week’s Rundown: Google distances itself from “platforms,” Snapchat and Twitter woo publishers and Amazon lags in India.

What’s in a name?
As Facebook gets blamed for everything from polarizing America to helping Donald Trump’s election, it’s no accident that Google is distancing itself from the social network. One way is how it’s referred to. Recently, Google execs have insisted to anyone who will listen that Google is not to be called a platform. They’d rather it be a “technology company” or “just Google.” There’s a fair point there that key differences exist among the big tech platforms; Facebook is a walled garden and built around social interactions, while Google is about indexing the world’s information. Both make their money from advertising. But the subtext is that Facebook is taking a beating from just about everyone right now, and Google wants to be seen as one of the good guys. Just don’t call it a media company. — Lucia Moses

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The post The Rundown: Google distances itself from ‘platforms’ appeared first on Digiday.

Twitter will crack down on automation and simultaneous actions across multiple accounts

(Reuters) — Twitter said on Wednesday it would no longer allow people to post identical messages from multiple accounts, cracking down on a tactic that Russian agents and others have allegedly used to make tweets or topics go viral.

The San Francisco-based social network also said it would not allow people to use software to simultaneously perform other actions such as liking or retweeting from multiple accounts. Continue reading “Twitter will crack down on automation and simultaneous actions across multiple accounts”

Publishers warm to Google, but still worry about getting crowded out in search results

Google has done several things to make publishers smile lately: From its work on fast-loading mobile pages to ending first-click-free to promoting subscription sales, Google has positioned itself favorably with publishers, especially as Facebook’s relationship with publishers has become increasingly strained. Continue reading “Publishers warm to Google, but still worry about getting crowded out in search results”

How the Guardian’s Instagram strategy is winning new readers

Like many publishers, the Guardian is using Instagram to cultivate a loyal, young audience that doesn’t visit its main digital products.

The publisher has steadily grown its following and has nearly 860,000 Instagram followers to date, up 57 percent from a year ago. More interesting yet, 60 percent of those who follow links to the Guardian’s site are new to the Guardian, according to the publisher. The plan is to encourage those followers to become regular readers of the Guardian’s site and apps and, in time, possibly even paying members. Continue reading “How the Guardian’s Instagram strategy is winning new readers”

Google details how Chrome will block ads


As planned, Google Chrome will start blocking ads on February 15. The company today shared more details on how this feature will work when it’s turned on tomorrow.

Google last year joined the Coalition for Better Ads, a group that offers specific standards for how the industry should improve ads for consumers. The company then revealed that Chrome will stop showing all ads (including those owned or served by Google) on websites that display non-compliant ads, as defined by the coalition. Continue reading “Google details how Chrome will block ads”

How Swedish tabloid Aftonbladet reached 250,000 digital subscribers

Swedish national tabloid Aftonbladet has become one of Europe’s biggest digital-subscriptions success stories.

The newspaper, owned by Scandinavian media giant Schibsted, has amassed 250,000 digital subscribers (at $7-$12 a month) since launching its digital subscriptions program in 2003, a lofty figure given Sweden’s population of 10 million. Aftonbladet made 255 million Swedish krona ($32 million) in profit in 2017, driven by both advertising and subscriptions, according to its latest financials released last week. Continue reading “How Swedish tabloid Aftonbladet reached 250,000 digital subscribers”

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