The NYT is boarding the AR train — here’s what that means for storytelling


The New York Times has just announced it would begin incorporating augmented reality in its journalism. The Times prominently featured the announcement on its website’s front page, speaking to the publisher’s commitment to offer its readers and subscribers the highest quality news content by investing in new digital content technologies. Continue reading “The NYT is boarding the AR train — here’s what that means for storytelling”

How The New York Times is using interactive tools to build loyalty (and ultimately subscriptions)

The New York Times’ lofty goal of getting to 10 million subscribers is an all-hands-on-deck mission — involving even its Interactive News desk, the group charged with creating graphs and other interactive elements that support the paper’s long articles. Continue reading “How The New York Times is using interactive tools to build loyalty (and ultimately subscriptions)”

How The New York Times gets people to spend 5 minutes per visit on its site

People aren’t just subscribing to The New York Times in greater numbers; they’re also spending more time on its site. In 2017, people spent about five minutes per visit on the Times’ site, which is up 35 percent from 2016, according to comScore reports pulled by an ad buyer. For the Times, getting users to spend more time on the site is part of a broader effort to drive subscriptions, which have become central to its business model. Continue reading “How The New York Times gets people to spend 5 minutes per visit on its site”

A Tough Message for News Organisations: Change or Become Irrelevant

It is currently one of the most pressing questions in journalism: how can legacy media successfully master the digital environment and flourish in a world dominated by the Internet and social media?

So great is the interest and the demand for answers that the Web is filled with think-pieces, best practice guidelines and conference talks on the topic yet, until recently, there has been little empirical research available.

A new report by Lucy Kueng, a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism and professor of strategy and innovation in media organisations, tries to address this gap. Continue reading “A Tough Message for News Organisations: Change or Become Irrelevant”

The New York Times has halved its free monthly articles to 5, its most significant paywall change since 2012

The great paywall tightening of 2017 continues. The New York Times said Friday that it will cut the number of free articles available to “most” non-subscribers each month from 10 to five, Bloomberg reported. The change is the most significant one the Times has made to its pay model since 2012, when it cut the number of monthly free articles from 20 to 10. (According to Bloomberg, “The Times may eventually offer a different number of free articles to non-subscribers based on how they arrive or their reading habits.”) Continue reading “The New York Times has halved its free monthly articles to 5, its most significant paywall change since 2012”

Finding the Parallels Between Improv Comedy and Product Management

“No, it’s not possible. There are a million reasons why we can’t build that feature you want. The tech stack doesn’t support it and it’s just not doable.”

As product managers, we’ve all heard or said this. When an idea comes along, whether it be through marketing, design, product, etc., it’s easy to fall into the trap of saying no and saying why something won’t work. We’re trained to do it: to protect our team’s time, to defend our prioritized roadmaps, and to avoid another headache of scrambling in the weeds. Continue reading “Finding the Parallels Between Improv Comedy and Product Management”

One year in: What The New York Times learned from its 360-degree video project, The Daily 360

Every day for the past year, The New York Times has published a 360-degree video. The installments for the Samsung-sponsored project, called The Daily 360, were shot across 57 countries, with the help of over 200 different Times journalists. The videos gathered 94 million views on Facebook, and 2 million views on YouTube; the company declined to share view counts for its owned and operated properties. Continue reading “One year in: What The New York Times learned from its 360-degree video project, The Daily 360”

Newsonomics: The New York Times’ Mark Thompson on regulating Facebook, global ambition, and when to stop the presses (forever)

Five years is a long time, especially in the media business. It was five years ago this week that Mark Thompson took on the top job at The New York Times Company. It was an enterprise still wobbling from the effects of the Great Recession, its new paywall only a year old. The Huffington Post was trumpeting that it had surpassed the Times in digital traffic — a recognition of Google’s market power and of Facebook’s emergence. The Times was a shrinking enterprise. It had shed revenues, profits, staff, and share price. It had also shed its previous CEO, Janet Robinson. Publisher Arthur Sulzberger’s pick of Thompson to replace her surprised many; despite having led the BBC’s ongoing transition to the increasingly digital world, Thompson had no publishing management experience. And he was a Brit, plucked out of London to head America’s flagship newspaper company.

Continue reading “Newsonomics: The New York Times’ Mark Thompson on regulating Facebook, global ambition, and when to stop the presses (forever)”

Experiments like WikiTribune, the collaborative news outlet created by Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, excites me. I love the idea of professional journalists working alongside members of the audience, sharing skills and knowledge. I love the feedback loop between users and creators, and have seen the productivity and partnership that can shine through in the spaces where these two designations meet. Collaborative projects – where news organizations and audiences tell stories in partnership – are also a potential way to address misinformation and build trust. At the Computation and Journalism Symposium, which took place October 13 and 14 at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., I sat down with three co-panelists to talk about the exciting new tools they’re building for collaborative journalism.

Read the full post How Journalists Are Using New Tools for Collaborative Journalism on MediaShift.

Social media crackdowns at the Times and Journal will backfire

The relationship between media outlets and social platforms like Twitter has always been tense. On some level, publishers know they have to be on social media, because that’s where the news happens, and it’s also where content gets shared—but at the same time, they are afraid of what might happen if reporters and editors speak […]

‘Trying to let our hair down’: How The New York Times is getting creative with push notifications

In June, The New York Times dropped seven emojis — two taxis, two hot dogs, a pencil, a heart and the Statue of Liberty — in a mobile push notification to promote its magazine’s all-comics issue on city life. Eric Bishop, who oversees push at the Times, said he started out thinking three emojis would be good (and already more than the Times had ever put in a push), but Jake Silverstein, the magazine’s editor, argued for more, saying: “I think we can make this even more fun and delightful.”

Continue reading “‘Trying to let our hair down’: How The New York Times is getting creative with push notifications”

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