Understanding the implications of Open Citations — how far along are we?

Understanding the implications of Open Citations — how far along are we?

The academic discovery space seems to be buzzing again. This space has become relatively stable after the introduction and maturity of Web Scale Discovery between 2009–2013, but things seem to be hotting up once again. Continue reading “Understanding the implications of Open Citations — how far along are we?”

@opencitations @EuropePMC_news and #EXCITEProject are happy to announce that applications to the Workshop on Open Citations (3-5 Sept, Bologna, Italy) are now open! See https://workshop-oc.github.io/  for details. @i4oc_org #OpenCitationsMonth #OpenCitations #EuropePMC #hackathonpic.twitter.com/EHumdTfTzl

and are happy to announce that applications to the Workshop on Open Citations (3-5 Sept, Bologna, Italy) are now open! See https://workshop-oc.github.io/  for details.

Early adopters of the OpenCitations Data Model

OpenCitations is very pleased to announce its collaboration with four new scholarly Research and Development projects that are early adopters of the recently updated OpenCitations Data Model, described in this blog post.

The four projects are similar, in that they each are independently using text mining and optical character recognition or PDF extraction techniques to extract citation information from the reference lists of published works, and are making these citations available as Linked Open Data. Three of the four will also use the OpenCitations Corpus as publication platform for their citation data.  The academic disciplines from which these citation data are being extracted are social science, humanities and economics. Continue reading “Early adopters of the OpenCitations Data Model”

Citations as First-Class Data Entities: The OpenCitations Data Model

Requirements for citations to be treated as First-Class Data Entities

In my introductory blog post, I listed five requirements for the treatment of citations as first-class data entities.  The second of these requirements is that they must have metadata structured using a generic yet appropriately detailed data model.

To fulfil that requirement, OpenCitations is pleased to announce the publication on 13 February 2018 of the OpenCitations Data Model, v1.6 [1].  This replaces the previous version, v1.5.3, published on 13 July 2016. Continue reading “Citations as First-Class Data Entities: The OpenCitations Data Model”

Citations as First-Class Data Entities: Introduction

Citations are now centre stage

As a result of the Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC), launched on April 6 last year, almost all the major scholarly publishers now open the reference lists they submit to Crossref, resulting in more than half a billion references being openly available via the Crossref API.

It is therefore time to think carefully about how citations are treated, and how they might be better handled as part of the Linked Open Data Web. Continue reading “Citations as First-Class Data Entities: Introduction”

OpenCitations and the Initiative for Open Citations: A Clarification

Some folk are confused, but OpenCitations and the Initiative for Open Citations, despite the similarity of their names, are two distinct organizations.

OpenCitations (http://opencitations.net) is an open scholarly infrastructure organization directed by Silvio Peroni and myself, and its primary purpose is to host and build the OpenCitations Corpus (OCC), an RDF database of scholarly citation data that now contains almost 13 million citation links. Continue reading “OpenCitations and the Initiative for Open Citations: A Clarification”

Understanding the implications of Open Citations – how far along are we?

The academic discovery space seems to be buzzing again. This space has become relatively stable after the introduction and maturity of Web Scale Discovery between 2009-2013, but things seem to be hotting up once again.

With the recent interest in integrating discovery of open access, as well as linked data (with a dash of machine learning and text mining)  we have the beginnings of an interesting situation. A third development which was harder to forsee is the rise in Open Citation movement which I will focus on in this post. Continue reading “Understanding the implications of Open Citations – how far along are we?”

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