The holy grail in Open Access: sharing that benefits authors

The holy grail of Open Access: sharing that benefits authors

As a researcher, you are often urged to make your work openly accessible. And sure, that’s a laudable goal, but… What’s in it for you?

With job prospects in academia being not that rosy, it is no surprise that open access is not the primary consideration for researchers considering where to get their work published. When push comes to shove, making a living is more important than access to your research.

But why not both? You can give yourself that career boost and support open access. Continue reading “The holy grail in Open Access: sharing that benefits authors”

What do journalists do with large amounts of text?

Barbara Maseda is on a John S. Knight Journalism Fellowship project at Stanford University, where she is working on designing text processing solutions for journalists. In a special guest post she explains what she’s found so far — and why she needs your help.

Over the last few months, I have been talking to journalists about their trials and tribulations with textual sources, trying to get as detailed a picture as possible of their processes, namely:

  • how and in what format they obtain the text,
  • how they find newsworthy information in the documents,
  • using what tools,
  • for what kinds of stories,

…among other details.

What I’ve found so far is fascinating: from tech-savvy reporters who write their own code when they need to analyze a text collection, to old-school investigative journalists convinced that printing and highlighting are the most reliable and effective options — and many shades of approaches in between. Continue reading “What do journalists do with large amounts of text?”

A Tough Message for News Organisations: Change or Become Irrelevant

It is currently one of the most pressing questions in journalism: how can legacy media successfully master the digital environment and flourish in a world dominated by the Internet and social media?

So great is the interest and the demand for answers that the Web is filled with think-pieces, best practice guidelines and conference talks on the topic yet, until recently, there has been little empirical research available.

A new report by Lucy Kueng, a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism and professor of strategy and innovation in media organisations, tries to address this gap. Continue reading “A Tough Message for News Organisations: Change or Become Irrelevant”

The problem with scientific publishing

And how to fix it

Periodical journals have been the principal means of disseminating science since the 17th century. Over the intervening three-and-a-half centuries journals have established conventions for publication — such as insisting on independent (and usually anonymous) peer review of submissions — that are intended to preserve the integrity of the scientific process. But they have come under increasing attack in recent years. What is wrong with scientific publishing in journals, and how can it be fixed? Continue reading “The problem with scientific publishing”

Video streaming research

Many publishers, societies and institutions are in the process of exploring ways to incorporate video into their websites and publishing platforms, whether as new product lines, for teaching, or to offer more value to existing products and services. Some may be unsure about how to go about developing a video strategy whilst others have a clear idea of what they need and are in the process of implementing video content.
This is an area which Simon Inger Consulting are increasingly asked about and thought it would be useful to survey the current state and thinking about streaming video.  With the support of GVPi (a digital publishing solutions company) they would like to find out from publishers, scholarly societies, professional associations and higher education institutions where they are in their video development plans, what they see as the main challenges and barriers to delivering video content online, and what opportunities they think streaming video offers.
They would like to invite you to take a very short survey (less than 5 minutes). The results of the research will be shared with the community. 

The China Media Observatory, Summer School 2017

Study media and communication at the University of Peking, July 2017

The China Media Observatory of the Università della Svizzera Italiana (USI), in cooperation with School of Journalism and Communication, Peking University, will operate the fourth Europe-China Dialogue: Media and Communication Studies Summer School at Peking University between 10/07/2017 and 19/07/2017.

The program is open to the full variety of academic work from the field of communication and media studies for scholars in their early academic careers, PhD students and masters students who have strong academic interests. It aims to bring together researchers from Europe, China, and North America in order to debate contemporary issues in media, communication, political economy and cultural studies. This year, the Summer School is specifically themed to discuss the challenges posed by the digitalization of the media sphere and the new trends in global communication.

We will only enroll 30 student participants to the programme. The composition of selected students will be ideally (but not limited to) half from Chinese institutions and half from European and other institutions from other places of the world. Three ECTS will be granted to those students who participate in the entire program. 

To apply: All participants are required to send an abstract (up to 500 words) of their research projects before 01/05/2017 to chinamediaobservatory@gmail.com. The confirmation of participant students will be sent by 10/05/2017, and the full-draft of research project should be sent before 15/06/2017.

For further information on the structure of the program visit http://www.euchinamediadialoguesummerschool.usi.ch

pic credit: Yiannis Theologos Michell, Flickr CC

The post The China Media Observatory, Summer School 2017 appeared first on European Journalism Observatory – EJO.

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